INFORMATION

TALKING HORSES - 91.3 SPORTFM
The Horse Industry contributes 10 billion dollars annually to the Australian economy and is in the top 5 of Australian employers. We are a very significant industry.

WA’s only weekly equestrian radio show Talking Horses, hosted by WA Horse Council Chairperson, Diane Bennit, is on every Wednesday between 6 and 7pm on 91.3 SportFM, discussing a range of topics that are relevant to the Western Australian equestrian population and conducting interviews with those from our industry.

If you are out of range and would still like to catch this show, go to www.sportfm.com.au thenTalking Horses then click listen live. If you miss the show, go to same web address and click podcast and you can download a copy of the show.
 

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN HORSE TRAILS –
MAPS and INFORMATION

A list of horse trails that have been mapped or have information available on them. This list is not exhaustive and there are more trails still to be mapped and listed. The links attached are for reference only, they do not constitute accurate, detailed information on each trail and users must make their own investigation for suitability for themselves and their horse.

VIEW TRAIL LIST

 

ARTICLES OF INTEREST

POST FIRE CARE FOR HORSES
Horse SA has shared three presentations relating to post fire injuries for West Australian horse owners.

Health & Performance Centre Dr Lidwien Verdegaal
 
“Management of large animals through bushfires – Dr James Meyer” presentation at “Post Fire Animal Health for Small Landholders”
9 Feb 2015 PDF

“How to get my horse through bushfire injuries ” Dr Erik Noschka
presentation at the “Post Fire Animal Health for Small Landholders”
23 Feb 2015
 

 



CLICK ON HIGHLIGHTED HEADING TO READ MORE INFORMATION FROM ARTICLES BELOW

HORSE RESCUE KENWICK May 2016

It took many hands, some creative thinking and a great deal of effort to rescue a 500 kilogram horse that had become mired in a boggy dam on Victoria Road, Kenwick earlier this month.
 
O
nce the trapped animal was reported, the Department of Fire and Emergency Services assembled a diverse team to undertake the rescue, including Fire and Rescue Service firefighters from the Perth and Maddington Stations, State Emergency Service (SES) Mounted Section volunteers, and an Urban Search and Rescue Officer. Local rangers and neighbours were also keen to pitch in and help.

“Diane Bennit from the WA Horse Council provided the Maddington crew with some technical advice over the phone and we also called on a vet to assess the horse before we tried to free it.

Horses: ‘Managing Properties and Feed Programs’ Field day / workshop series - 2016
Brookleigh Sunday - 14th Feb 2016
Serpentine Sunday - 20th Mar 2016
Henley Brook Sunday

Expert presenters and Q&A on: Assessing Property & Planning for Horse Use
• What do I need to know before buying a property for horses? – with case studies presented.
• Managing soil, pasture and weeds on properties. Local Government Land management Responsibilities
• Shire environmental responsibilities.
• Local horse property management options.Understanding Horse Feed Programs
• Understanding horse nutrition.
• Feeding programs for Competition, Recreation riding and brood mares.

E: graham.mcalpine@perthnrm.com Mob: 0477 066 689

Download the pdf

FIRES - Jan 2016 UPDATED 10th JANUARY
OFFERS OF HELP FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY THE FIRES IN WA
The Western Australian Horse Council would like to extend  their sympathy to those people who have been affected by the fires across W A.The WAHC would like to express their grateful thanks for the following offers of help and support that have been received from businesses, clubs and individuals.
 
If you would like to offer any assistance please contact WAHC Chair Diane Bennit  -
9293 3577 bennit@iinet.net.au – We require your or the business name, address and phone number – only the contact details will be published.  Information must be sent by email

FOR DETAILS ON THOSE WHO SUPPORTED WHO ADVISED OF THEIR SUPPORT go to Emergency accommodation/fires2015_2016

TAKING THE REINS- The Western Australian Recreational Horse Trail Strategy October 2015

Taking the Reins is the first state wide strategy for horse trail access in Western Australia. Its aim is to ensure that Western Australia takes advantage of the opportunities and benefits that horse trail riding presents, whilst at the same time addressing existing
challenges.
This Strategy has been developed to provide clear guidance and structure for decision makers, land managers, trails planners and the horse trail community. It is a coordinated, structured approach to horse trail access, development and management, driven by an overarching vision.
The Western Australian Horse Trail Strategy sits under the WA State Trails Strategy 20092015 as an activity specific strategy, as identified in the State Trails Implementation Plan.

Click to download the strategy pdf 1.3mg

EMERGENCY LARGE ANIMAL RESCUE COURSES June 2015

11th and 12th June at Brookleigh in the Swan Valley, attracted a large number of participants to the two courses and to the two half day awareness talks on the 9th.

To see a selection of photographs from this events click here

 
     

EMERGENCY LARGE ANIMAL RESCUE COURSE April 2015
The WA Hore Council presents this hands-on course for horse owners, equestrian groups and associated and emergency responders (shire rangers, police, veterinarians and fire and rescue services) to educate in the rescue of hroses and other large animals. COURSE - 11th and 12th june- only 50 spots available pplications close 1st May (download information pdf) (download application pdf)

SUGGESTED EVENT INCIDENT/ACCIDENT PROCEDURES April 2015
These Guidelines are not intended to, nor can they possibly, cover all contingencies – they are intended to help organizations understand how to be better prepared in managing any accidents that occur.

WA's LARGE ANIMAL RESCUE HORSE NAMED Feb 2015
The arrival of the 380 kilo 15 hh model horse for use in Large Animal Rescue training prompted the the Western Australian Horse Council (WAHC) to run a  'Name the Horse' competition. Promoted via facebook, web and on  the 91.3 FM ‘Talking Horses’ radio program the competition  attracted 120 entries from all over Australia.    MaryAnne Leighton from QLD the author of the book 'Equine Emergency Rescue' was the judge and chose an entry from Melbourne.  

The horse is now named  LAR’ry,  the initials stand for Large Animal Rescue and is pronounced 'Larry'.  The WAHC extends their thanks to everyone who took part in the competition and is looking forward to seeing LAR’rry being utilised in training seminars that will

The winner, Judi Tainsh from Victoria, is a previous successful competitor, breeder of over 30 Australian Ponies and Galloways that went on to be multiple Champions at Royal Show and Breed Championships throughout Australia.    Active on the panels for many horse and pony breeds, she has judged at Royal and Championship shows in all states of Australia.  Judi has run her own  business, for 13 years, providing secretarial and administrative services  to various companies and not for profit organizations.

The winning name was forwarded to  Tony Ward  the owner of the company  Resquip Limited in the UK, that manufacture these horses, and other emergency equipment. Tony  replied  "Love it, absolutely brilliant!"

2014 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Sept 2014
Thursday August 7th 2014 was the night of the WA Horse Council’s Annual General Meeting and, as has now become the tradition, it was a ‘full house’ of over 60 people that packed into the Bunk House at Brookleigh Equestrian Estate in the Swan Valle

HORSE MANAGEMENT, CARE AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES SURVEY
Perth Region NRM and the Western Australian Horse Council are working on a project to put horses on the map.
If you are responsible for the care and management of one or many horses, we want you to help in building a picture of the horse community in the south west division of Western Australia.
You can help by going online to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K55BYHK
any time from Monday 5 May and Friday 16 May 2014 and completing a survey. The results will be available from the Western Australian Horse Council and Perth Region NRM later this year.

FREE FIELD DAYS AND WORKSHOPS
Facilitated by Sandy Pate of Perth Regional NRM for WAHC.
Kellerberrin Saturday 10 May 2014 CANCELLED
Albany Saturday 31 May 2014
Dardanup Sunday 8 June 2014
To register go to: www.trybooking.com/82109 To download PDF click here

SUMMER HEAT ALERT by Dr John Kohnke (download pdf 200kb)
Horse owners in the southern half of WA should be aware that on a hot day the relative humidity may be well under 20 so the 100 total to trigger remedial action will not be reached. However, those wishing to subject horses to strenuous activity on hot days may find helpful advice included in the 'Hot Weather Policy' on the EWA website.

VENUES REQUIRED FOR FREE FIELD DAYS IN RURAL AREAS Feb 2014
Following the huge success of the Free Field Days organized by the Western Australian Horse Council over the last five years, many requests have been received for Field Days to be held outside the metropolitan area. Perth Region NRM has agreed to fund two in country areas. For more information click here

EMPLOYMENT OPORTUNITY... Equine Welfare Officer Feb 2014
Due to the increasing interest and demand for retired racehorses to be used as pleasure and performance horses, Racing & Wagering WA (RWWA) has developed an Equine Welfare Officer position to facilitate their 'Retirement from Racing Program'.
Information on the position can be obtained through: http://www.rwwa.com.au/home/equine-welfare-officer-18870.html
Applications close February 17th 2014. For any queries, contact Rebecca Tucker the RWWA Human Resources Advisor on 9445 5377

Changes to Horse Identification Regulations - Microchip can replace Branding-
Dec 2013
Changes to regulations now allow WA horses that do not belong to a breed society or equine association to be microchipped instead of branded and still meet the identification requirements of the law.

Property Identification Code Presentation from AGM by Beth Green Dept. Agriculture and Food
The presentation by Beth Green (DAFWA) at the Annual General Meeting of the WA Horse Council that states ALL horse owners must register for a PIC for the property where their horse resides, is available for downloading. Should you have questions on this topic or require more information then please contact (DAFWA).

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD PDF presentation ( 422kb)

MYSTERY VIRUS IN WA - Aug 2013
Four properties were ientified in June 2013 as having horses that showed symptoms of smallpapules lumps) in the mouth and on the side of the tongue and showed mild ill-health signs. Reports indicated that some humans and other animals also developed the symptoms.

HORSE CONFIRMED WITH LYSSAVIRUS - a rabies related virus- May18 2013
Two horses have been euthanased at a property in Queensland and one has tested positive to the bat-born rabies like Lyssavirus. The 20 horses on the property are under quarantine and owner Cameron Osborne has been quoted as saying bats were not known visitors to the property.

HENDRA VIRUS: Reduce the risk of the virus occurring in WA - April 2013
“While the risk of Hendra virus occurring in WA is low, flying foxes north of Shark Bay have been shown to carry Hendra virus and horses in contact with them have some risk of becoming infected,” Dr Hawkins said.

Thoroughbred R&D Levy Proposal- April 2013
A proposed statutory R&D levy will be presented for discussion to all 8,500 registered Thoroughbred breeders, TBA and state breeding association members for their consideration and input. 
TBA is proposing:
• A charge of $10 per mare covered per season and paid by the stallion owner, and;
• A charge of $10 per mare returned per season and paid by the broodmare owner.

'Rails to Trails' - BUSSELTON TO MARGARET RIVER - April 2013
Horse riding was originally included in a planned trail of 160 km between Margaret River and Busselton in a ‘Rails to Trails’ venture but this has now been downgraded to a 12 km stretch. The Leeuwin Horseriders Group need your support. Click the heading for more information or email: peekyh@dodo.com.au 0409104212 or 97586740.

HENDRA VIRUS: managing the risks in Western Australia- Feb 2013 Hendra Virus PDF
By Dr Sue Skirrow, Emergency Animal Disease Preparedness manager
What is Hendra virus?
Hendra virus is carried by flying foxes (fruit bats) in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and surrounding islands. The virus does not appear to affect flying foxes but can occasionally spread to horses. Infected horses usually die.
Forty-one Hendra virus disease cases have occurred in Australia since 1994 involving 82 horses. All have been in either Queensland or northern New South Wales. These states are investigating the reasons for the increased number of cases in 2011 and 2012.

EQUINE INDUSTRY GROUP CALLS FOR STUDY OF ECONOMIC VALUE
AND FOR HALT TO URBAN ENCROACHMENT
-
Dec 12
More than 40 West Australian Equine Industry representatives converged on the State Equestrian Centre on Nov 30th for the inaugural meeting of an Equine Industry Advocacy and Advisory group. This group have called for harmonisation and collaborative thinking to tackle the issue of a rapidly expanding urban housing areas resulting in the closure of equestrian facilities and riding trails across the state.

HORSE HAVENS FOR EMERGENCY EVACUATION - FORM - October 2012
Form is available for those wishing to offer temporary assistance in the form of TEMPORARY accommodation for horses/owners in the event of a disaster from floods, fires, etc. Click on heading or go to Equine health, Welfare and Research Portfolio

2012 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - August 2012
The WAHC Annual General Meeting was held at Brookleigh Equestrian Centre in the Swan Valley on August 16th. For information on the presentations click the heading.

HORSE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR WA- June 2012
See Environment, landcare, tracks and trails for details on horse and land management.

ARE YOUR HORSES BEING TERRORISED BY STABLE (Biting ) FLIES ?
A meeting is being held on Monday March 12th 2012 at 7pm at Woodridge Community Hall to discuss the increasing numbers of these flies and their spread into previously unaffected areas, the damage they are inflicting on horses, cattle and other livestock and what can be done about this. The Minister for Agriculture Hon Terry Redman MLA will be attending along with other state politicians and Dept of Ag staff and Local Govt officers along with a presentation by Dr David Cook (UWA). For more information contact 0400970001 or 96553024.

If unable to attend please send emails regarding the negative and animal welfare aspects of stable flies and horses and how it affects you, your horses and your lifestyle to Hon Terry Redman MLA, Minister for Agriculture and Food, level 11 Dumas House, 2 Havelock Street, West perth 6005 email Minister.Redman@dpc.wa.gov.au

Click the heading for further details and directions

HORSE HAVENS FOR EMERGENCY EVACUATION- fires Nov 2011
See Equine Health, Welfare and Research Portfolio

POSITIVE HENDRA SWABS FOR TWO HORSES EUTHANASED- 11/10/2011
The Department of Primary Industries (DPI) QLD has advised that a sick horse on a property in the Caboolture area has been euthanased after returning a positive test result for Hendra virus infection.The horse became sick over the weekend of 8-9 October and was treated by a private veterinarian. Samples were taken for Hendra virus testing and the positive result came back late on 10 October.
Another horse had been euthanased at this property in the week before. Biosecurity Queensland is also seeking samples from that horse to test for Hendra virus.
Currently, two horses remain on the property. Biosecurity Queensland is quarantining the property, and will assess and monitor the other horses at this location over the next month.
Hendra virus is a notifiable disease. If you suspect Hendra virus, please contact Biosecurity Queensland immediately on 13 25 23 or the Emergency Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888.

Illness Kills 16 Horses In Queensland - Oct 7th 2011
A mystery illness has killed 16 quarter horses on a property west of the Gold Coast, and vets and Biosecurity Queensland are trying to pinpoint why so many healthy animals died so quickly. With Hendra virus ruled out as the cause on Friday, scientists and local vets are leaning towards the possibility the animals may have fallen victim to some type of toxic weed.

WA HORSE COUNCIL 2011 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
WHERE: The Bunkroom, BROOKLEIGH EQUESTRIAN ESTATE1235 Great Northern Highway, Upper Swan.
WHEN: Thursday 25th August - 7pm
WHY: Current issues that affect the horse community are discussed and guest speakers cover some of these, such as some of the MANDATORY changes to Horse Transport Regulations that reuire Veterinary Certificates for travelling pregnant mares; rules for maximum travelling time; rules for transporting injured horses for treatment; plus more that will be discussed by DEPT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, ANIMAL WELFARE Technical Officer Charlotte McIntyre.
Another speaker will be FESA DISTRICT MANAGER Syd Bignell

EVERYONE WELCOME
Come along as an individual horse owner or represent your breed, club, sport, organization

NEW BIOSECURITY GUIDE FROM WESTERN AUSTRALIA'S HORSE INDUSTRY - 28/7/11
Horse owners, trainers and service providers were reminded of the importance of effective biosecurity to minimise the spread of infectious diseases at the launch of a horse biosecurity package as part of an industry breakfast at Ascot today.

“ All horse organisations and service providers are entitled to a FREE copy of ‘ Horse Alert WA ‘ . If you have not received your copy, please contact the WA Horse Council on bennit@optusnet.com.au

Gillard Government helping in response to Hendra 26/7/11
The Gillard Government has today announced it will be providing up to $6 million as part of the fight against Hendra.
The Gillard Government understands there are community concerns around Hendra caused by recent developments in Queensland and Northern New South Wales.

FOURTH HORSE DEATH FROM HENDRA IN NSW -July 17th 2011
The NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) has confirmed Hendra virus as the cause of a fourth horse death on the NSW North Coast, this time at a property near Lismore.

NEW CASE HENDRA VIRUS IN Mt ALFORD, SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND - July 3rd 2011
Biosecurity Queensland is today managing a second confirmed case of Hendra virus at Mt Alford in the Boonah area. A horse became sick on 1 July 2011 and samples from this horse were sent to Biosecurity Queensland for testing.

Hendra virus horse tests – first round results negative - July 2nd 2011
Test results from samples taken from five horses on a property at Kerry near Beaudesert have come back negative for Hendra virus.

NEW HENDRA CASE - June 29th 2011
The Australian Horse Council has released information on a positive case of Hendra virus that has been confirmed at Kerry, near Beaudesert. Biosecurity Queensland is managing the case after test results on a deceased horse came back positive for the virus.

Three cases of KULIN VIRUS - MOSQUITO BORNE DISEASE - found in WA . - May 20th 2011
Three recent cases of neurological disease in horses in Western Australia caused by Kunjin virus have been confirmed.
Acting Chief Veterinary Officer Peter Morcombe said the affected horses were from areas north and east of Perth and in the Goldfields.

MOSQUITO BORNE DISEASE - UNUSUAL NEUROLOGICAL SIGNS . - April 3rd 2011
The Australian Veterinary Association is warning all horse owners of an unusual illness that may result from an infection with mosquito borne virus in the Kunjin-West Nile group. The symptoms can include the onset of neurological signs including increased responsiveness to touch and sound, facial paralysis and difficulty masticating, hypermetria in forelimbs and weakness in hindquarters, general ataxia and/or recumbency.

STATE TRAILS CONFERENCE 0n 1st April 2011. - February 14th 2011
All horse owners are invited to attend this conference as ATHRA WA will be making a presentation on the use of multi-purpose trails, specifically with horse access.

NATIONAL HORSE ORGANISATIONS WELCOME AGREEMENT
- February 14th 2011
In a joint statement, representatives of four national horse organisations today welcomed news that agreement had been reached, that will enable them to formally sign the Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) in early March.

TAX RELIEF FOR BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY FLOODS AND BUSHFIRES- February 13th 2011
The Australian Taxation Department has issued a notification that those busiesses affected by the natural disasters inculding floods and bushfires in WA.

BUSHFIRE ASSISTANCE - WAHC Final Notification- February 8th 2011
The bushfires of black Sunday (6th Feb 2011) in the hills area of Roleystone, Kelmscot and Swan Valley have, at the last count, destroyed 94 homes and left many without fencing and feed for their animals. Offers of help were quick to come in from the equestrian community.

CARNARVON FLOOD RELIEF - NOW QUEENSLAND FLOOD RELIEF - January 17th 2011
A financial relief fund started for those in the Carnarvon (WA) area affected by the floods has been transferred to the Queensland Horse Council, at the request of the Carnarvon Equestrian community, to help horse owners in Qld after the devestating floods that affected such a large area of that state.

SUSPECTED STRANGLES OUTBREAK - WAHC notification 2 - August 17th 2010
The following information was sourced by WA Horse Council committee person Dr Kathy Klein (Chair of our Bio-security and Horse Welfare Portfolio) regarding strangles and the suspected outbreak in the Wanneroo area.

SUSPECTED STRANGLES OUTBREAK- WAHC notification 1 - August 15th 2010
The Western Australian Horse Council would like to pass on the following information concerning the suspected outbreak of Strangles in the Wanneroo area.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
- Aug 2010
The AGM was held on Wednesday 11th August - 7.30pm.

EQUINE HERPES VIRUS IN TASMANIA- Aug 2010
A recent outbreak of EHV1 in Tasmanian homebred mares where over 30% were affected including one death and several abortions, should remind all horse owners to be aware of this disease.

HORSE INDUSTRY LEVY July 2010

A range of levy options have been suggested by the horse community via email to the Australian Horse Industry Council, through web-based forums, as decisions at formal meetings of horse sector associations and by direct email contact to their office. Approximately 400 associations and individuals made contact.

HORSE INDUSTRY LEVY June 2010
The Primary Industries Ministerial Council (PIMC) set a deadline of 1 December 2010 for the horse industry to show that it is prepared to support an EADRA.

CLOSING WHITFORDS HORSE BEACH May 2010
The WAHC presented a submission asking the Joondalup Council to reconsider the decision to close the Whitfords Beach to horses, and attended and addressed two rallies organized by the ‘Whitfords Horse Beach’ committee.

WA TRAILS CONFERENCE - June 2009
The WA Trails Conference 2009 was held at the Point Walter Conference and Recreation Centre in Bicton on Thursday 11th June. More than 100 people were in attendance from diverse range of interests in the trails community, however a Western Australian Horse Council delegate was the only representative of the equestrian industry.
Click heading for more details.

DENTAL PRACTiTIONERS - May 2009
Most horse owners will use an equine desntist at some stage and should be aware of the qualifications of the person performing this task.

HORSE INDUSTRY LEVIES - April 2009
The introduction of legislation that proposes a levy scheme whereby the horse industry contributes towards the costs of responding to any future disease outbreak has been a needed to provide certainty and security for all horse sectors.

Passage of the bills through Parliament is the first step towards the horse industry signing the Emergency Animal Response Disease Agreement (EADRA) which commits the Government to fighting any future diseases in conjunction with industry. Without a signed EADRA there is no compulsion on any Government to contribute to the costs of containing and eradicating any future diseases.

 

 

HORSE MANAGEMENT, CARE AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES SURVEY

Perth Region NRM and the Western Australian Horse Council are working on a project to put horses on the map.

If you are responsible for the care and management of one or many horses, we want you to help in building a picture of the horse community in the south west division of Western Australia.

We want to hear from you if you have horses as a business, for competition, general recreation or as a service to the community. We are interested in how many horses there are, how they are being kept, the extent and awareness of biosecurity measures within the region and about how horses contribute to our economy.

You can help by going online to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K55BYHK
any time from Monday 5 May and Friday 16 May 2014 and completing a survey. The results will be available from the Western Australian Horse Council and Perth Region NRM later this year.

If you would like to find out more about the project and/or the survey, you can contact Sandy Pate, Regional Landcare Facilitator
or Mog Piasecka, Stakeholder Engagement Manager at enquiries@perthregionnrm.com or by telephoning 9374 3333

Please support this survey by circulating to all equestrian industry contacts, cutting and pasting onto any Facebook pages, newsletters, other social media, you use which are equestrian related. Perth NRM have been very generous with funding which has enabled the WAHC to run a series of FREE field days in previous years. We now need to support them by making information available which will be useful to enable further funding.

Thoroughbred R&D Levy Proposal - April 13
 All Thoroughbred breeders are being encouraged to attend levy seminars scheduled across Australia in May and June this year, at which a proposed statutory R&D levy will be presented for discussion. 
 
Thoroughbred Breeders Australia (TBA) President Trevor Lobb said levy information kits will be posted next week to all 8,500 registered Thoroughbred breeders, TBA and state breeding association members for their consideration and input. 
 
In summary TBA is proposing:
 
• A charge of $10 per mare covered per season and paid by the stallion owner, and;
• A charge of $10 per mare returned per season and paid by the broodmare owner.
 
Mr Lobb said, "For many years now, the Australian Thoroughbred Industry has been reliant upon an ad-hoc arrangement of government funding and voluntary contributions from industry bodies and individuals, in order to undertake essential research work on behalf of the whole industry".
 
"The Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC) has been the major contributor to the Horse RD&E Program since its inception in 1995. However, from 1 July 2013 RIRDC can no longer match dollar-for-dollar current horse industry voluntary contributions of which 80% has come from the Thoroughbred sector. Prior attempts to introduce an equitable statutory levy, whereby owners from all horse sectors contribute, have failed. We remain one of the few primary industries of significance that does not yet have a statutory levy to fund essential RD&E projects," said Mr Lobb.
 
"Industry must now develop a more secure and sustainable funding base, and a statutory levy paid by all registered Thoroughbred breeders is the most equitable way of sharing the costs and benefits of such work particularly as the Australian Government will only match industry's contribution dollar-for-dollar if a statutory levy is supported by Thoroughbred breeders," said Mr Lobb.
 
"All Thoroughbred breeders should read the discussion paper provided in the levy information kit and if possible attend one of the regional levy seminars scheduled across Australia in May and June this year.
 
"If approved, the statutory levy will raise more than $400,000 annually from breeder contributions, which will be payable by all Thoroughbred stallion and broodmare owners and will be compulsorily collected by the Australian Stud Book on all registered broodmare returns and coverings commencing 1 August 2014, or a date to be determined by the Minister," said Mr Lobb.
 
"We strongly urge industry to support the proposal, as it is practical, feasible and affordable for breeders across all levels.  The success of the Thoroughbred industry in Australia depends heavily on research and development," concluded Mr Lobb.
 
Further information and regular updates on the Thoroughbred R&D Levy proposal, the regional seminar schedule and levy ballot arrangements are also available on the TBA website: www.tbaus.com
 
For further media comment on the Thoroughbred breeders levy proposal and the industry consultation program please contact:
 
• TBA President, Trevor Lobb
• TBA CEO, Chauncey Morris:  0409 201 221
• Or the relevant regional industry contacts which can be located on the TBA website at www.tbaus.com
 
ENDS

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POSITIVE HENDRA SWABS FOR TWO HORSES EUTHANASED - 11.10.2011
The Department of Primary Industries (DPI) QLD has advised that a sick horse on a property in the Caboolture area has been euthanased after returning a positive test result for Hendra virus infection.The horse became sick over the weekend of 8-9 October and was treated by a private veterinarian. Samples were taken for Hendra virus testing and the positive result came back late on 10 October.
Another horse had been euthanased at this property in the week before. Biosecurity Queensland is also seeking samples from that horse to test for Hendra virus.
Currently, two horses remain on the property. Biosecurity Queensland is quarantining the property, and will assess and monitor the other horses at this location over the next month.
Hendra virus is a notifiable disease. If you suspect Hendra virus, please contact Biosecurity Queensland immediately on 13 25 23 or the Emergency Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888.

For more hendra information visit:www.dpi.qld.gov.au

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Illness Kills 16 Horses In Queensland ILL- Oct 7th 2011
A mystery illness has killed 16 quarter horses on a property west of the Gold Coast, and vets and Biosecurity Queensland are trying to pinpoint why so many healthy animals died so quickly. With Hendra virus ruled out as the cause on Friday, scientists and local vets are leaning towards the possibility the animals may have fallen victim to some type of toxic weed.

The horses, owned by Steve Hogno, started dropping dead on Thursday. Steve, who was working at a mine site in Western Australia, returned to his home at Kooralbyn near Beaudesert on Friday morning.The horses appear to have died quickly, they just dropped. Hendra tests have come back clear, which leaves it a mystery as to what caused the deaths, but knowing there's not Hendra in the area has been a relief for locals.

Autopsies have been performed on some of the dead quarter horses, but results won't be known until Monday or Tuesday. Samples of brain, lungs, spleen and other organs have been taken, and they have to be fixed in formalin for a few days before thin slices can be taken and examined under a microscope to see if an infectious disease or a toxin has killed the horses. Queensland's chief vet Rick Symons said there was no sign of foul play and the RSPCA has ruled out neglect. Locals noticed five dead and three sick fillies and mares, which were infested with ticks, in a paddock near Kooralbyn on Thursday.The three sick horses were euthanased, but the death toll increased to 12 on Friday morning. By late afternoon four more had been put down, lifting the death toll to 16 with only nine surviving.

The last remaining horses have been moved from the paddockand it appears they will be OK, although there is no guarantee.

Dr Ahern said he doubted speculation that paralysis ticks may be responsible for killing the horses, with some kind of toxin a more likely cause. The progression of the illness is not typical of what you'd expect from paralysis ticks,' he said. Paralysis ticks very infrequently cause paralysis in adult horses.'

Steve Hogno said weeds were the most likely cause. Weeds that were in the paddock that nobody knew about them,' he said.

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GILLARD GOVERNMENT HELPING IN RESPONSE TO HENDRA July 26/7/11
The Gillard Government has today announced it will be providing up to $6 million as part of the fight against Hendra.
The Gillard Government understands there are community concerns around Hendra caused by recent developments in Queensland and Northern New South Wales.
The $6 million in committed funds will be used to better understand the virus through enhanced research.
Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Senator Joe Ludwig, said the funding would be used to boost research into issues raised by the recent identified cases of the Hendra virus.
“This funding will go towards better understanding the virus in terms of its impact on:
· Human health;
· Animal health; and
· Environmental biodiversity.”
The nation’s leading medical research body, the National Health and Medical Research Council, is allocating up to $3 million for urgent research to better understand and fight the Hendra Virus.
A further $3 million will be provided for Hendra virus research and impacts as part of a collaborative contribution across Government from the Agriculture, Innovation, and Environment portfolios.
“The research will examine the biology of the virus and will give governments and the authorities a clearer idea of the virus, its movements, how to combat it and how to manage it better.
“Although the risk to human health from recent identified cases has been considered low, it is still important to better understand this virus.”
This initiative is on top of work being done by Australia’s premier science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.
The CSIRO is devoting around $6 million this year to Hendra-related research, including work on improved diagnostic tests, disease pathogenesis, and the development of a Hendra vaccine for horses.
Additionally, the CSIRO conducts emergency diagnostic testing for Hendra and other animal diseases at its Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong, Victoria.
The Government’s funding will complement contributions of $3 million over three years from each of the New South Wales and Queensland Governments.
The Gillard Government, through the Agriculture, Health, Environment, and Innovation departments, will continue to work closely with the Hendra Virus Taskforce on this prioritised research

Senator the Hon. Joe Ludwig, Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
Senator for Queensland THE HON MARK BUTLER MP Acting Minister for Health and Ageing
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FOURTH HORSE DEATH CONFIRMED TO HENDRA ON THE NSW COAST - July 17th 2011
The NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) has confirmed Hendra virus as the cause of a fourth horse death on the NSW North Coast, this time at a property near Lismore.
“One property has been placed in quarantine and the dead horse has been buried,” NSW Chief Veterinary Officer Dr Ian Roth said.
“There is one other horse on the quarantined property which is currently showing no signs of illness.”
Dr Roth said the horse was reported as dying suddenly in the paddock on Thursday and a local Livestock Health and Pest Authority (LHPA) veterinarian took a blood sample from the horse on Thursday evening.
“The sample was sent to DPI’s Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute for laboratory analysis and results confirmed the Hendra virus last night,” Dr Roth said. “Horse movements on and off the property are being checked by veterinary staff.”
The Lismore area property was the third in NSW affected by Hendra virus after properties at Wollongbar and Macksville were quarantined earlier in the month. In NSW there are now four horse deaths to Hendra virus – two on one property near Wollongbar and single horse deaths on properties near Macksville and Lismore.
Dr Roth said there were no links to the Wollongbar or Macksville properties or the recent Hendra outbreaks in Queensland.
“Once again the horse had been in a paddock containing a fig tree, so it is likely that flying foxes were the source of infection,” he said. “Hendra virus can spread from flying foxes to horses and, rarely, from horses to people.”
Mr Roth said Hendra virus can cause a range of clinical signs in horses. “Hendra should be considered in horses where there is acute onset of fever and rapid progression to death associated with either respiratory or nervous signs. “If you suspect your horse has Hendra virus keep away from the horse and call your private veterinarian immediately. The vet will notify the local Livestock Health and Pest Authority or an inspector with DPI if they consider the case highly suspect for Hendra. If they are unavailable, and the illness is progressing rapidly, call the Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888.

“We encourage all horse owners to be vigilant and monitor the health of the horse – and only take a healthy horse off their property.
“The best solution at the moment is to try to keep horses protected from flying foxes.”
Dr Roth said there has been no evidence of human-to-human or flying fox-to-human spread of Hendra virus.
NSW DPI advises horse owners to take precautions in areas with flying foxes - to reduce the risk of their horses becoming infected:
•Place feed and water containers under cover.
•Do not place feed and water under trees, especially trees with fruit.
•Do not use feed that could attract flying foxes, such as apples, carrots, or molasses.
•If possible, remove horses from paddocks where flowering trees have temporarily attracted flying foxes.
•If removing horses is not possible, take horses out during times of peak flying fox activity, usually at dusk and during the night.
More information on Hendra virus is available on website www.agriculture.nsw.gov.au/info/hendra
NSW Health advises people to always take the following steps to reduce the risk of becoming infected with Hendra virus:
•Cover any cuts or abrasions on exposed skin before handling horses and wash your hands well with soap and water, especially after handling your horse's mouth or nose (eg fitting or removing a bridle) and before eating, smoking or touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
•Don't kiss horses on the muzzle (especially not if the horse is sick).
•Use personal protective equipment to protect yourself from the body fluids of horses.
NSW Health Hendra virus Factsheet can be on the NSW Health website: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/factsheets/infectious/hendra.html

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NEW CASE HENDRA VIRUS IN Mt ALFORD, SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND - July 3rd 2011
Biosecurity Queensland is today managing a second confirmed case of Hendra virus at Mt Alford in the Boonah area. A horse became sick on 1 July 2011 and samples from this horse were sent to Biosecurity Queensland for testing. The horse was later euthanased by a private veterinarian. Test results overnight have confirmed the horse had Hendra virus infection. Previously a horse on the property was sick on 20 June 2011 and was later euthanased by a private veterinarian. Samples collected at the time will be tested for Hendra virus. There are eight horses currently on the property that are being monitored closely and will be tested.
The property has been quarantined to restrict the movement of horses on and off.
There are no links between the horses or the property in this incident and the current incidents at Beaudesert and in New South Wales.

Hendra virus in Beaudesert
A third property has been quarantined as part of the Beaudesert incident. This is a precautionary measure after tracing of horses on the original infected property at Kerry, showed possible contact with a horse at the third
property. The first rounds of test results on the 20 horses at the second Beaudesert property at Biddaddaba have come back negative. This is the first of three rounds of testing required to clear the property.Information about Hendra virus
Biosecurity Queensland assesses each emergency disease incident independently. The Equine Influenza incident in 2007/08, required a lockdown of affected areas in Queensland due to its highly infectious nature. As Hendra virus is not a highly infectious virus, there are no lockdown restrictions for the Queensland horse industry. The horse industry is not subject to movement restrictions for Hendra virus, except for the four properties under quarantine - three in the Beaudesert area and one in the Boonah area.

Community Engagement
Community engagement officers will be in Beaudesert and Boonah over the weekend providing information and answering any questions residents may have on their situation. To find where the mobile office will be located, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website

More information
Notify suspected Hendra virus cases by contacting Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23 (during business hours) or the Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888 (24-hour hotline).
For general information on Hendra virus, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website at www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au

For human related enquiries, contact the Queensland Health Hotline on 13HEALTH (13 43 25 84). Dr. Rick Symons Chief Veterinary Officer Biosecurity Queensland.
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Hendra virus horse tests – first round results negative - July 2nd 2011
Test results from samples taken from five horses on a property at Kerry near Beaudesert have come back negative for Hendra virus.
Biosecurity Queensland Chief Veterinary Officer Dr Rick Symons said while the results were promising, these were just the first of three rounds of testing. “These results were for the five horses on the property where a horse became infected with Hendra virus,” Dr Symons said. “Yesterday samples were taken from all twenty horses on the second property at Biddaddaba where the infected horse was transported and later died and the results are expected back in the next couple of days. All of the horses on both properties are under observation by Biosecurity Queensland staff in conjunction with the horse owners. However, we need to complete three negative rounds of testing on a property before the quarantine can be lifted. Typically this takes around 32 days. All neighbours of the infected properties have been visited by Biosecurity Queensland and Queensland Health who provided information about the incident and discussed Hendra virus.”

Dr Symons said people in the Beaudesert area could obtain information about Hendra virus from the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation’s mobile office. “The office is at 29-31 William Street and will be open from 9am until 4pm. There are a number of horse owners in the area and more than 50 people visited the mobile office yesterday. The main queries were around the transport of horses and specifics about the virus itself. In relation to transport, apart from animals on the two affected properties, horses can be freely moved within and outside of the Beaudesert area. As for Hendra virus, it is present in flying fox populations which can be transferred to horses, between horses, and from horses to humans. However the risk of horses being infected, and in turn humans, is very low. The few cases of Hendra virus infection in humans have been the result of very close contact with an infected horse’s body fluids such as blood, nasal discharge, saliva, or urine. There is no evidence of human-to-human or flying fox-to-human spread of Hendra virus.”

Dr Symons said there were precautions horse owners could take to help prevent Hendra virus infection. “Owners can help protect their horses by taking measures to keep them away from trees where there are flying foxes, keeping water containers under cover and feeding horses under cover.”

For more information about Hendra virus visit www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au or call 13 25 23.
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NEW HENDRA CASE - June 29th 2011
On Saturday a private vet attended a sick horse on a property which was moved to a nearby second property where it died on Sunday. Biosecurity Queensland began implementing control procedures after blood samples taken from the horse came back positive last night. Other horses on the properties are currently being quarantined and Biosecurity Queensland staff are on site today to provide residents in the area with the latest information about Hendra virus. At this stage it is not clear whether any human is at risk. Doctors from Queensland Health's Gold Coast Public Health Unit will offer any testing or treatment to people as required. This is the 15th known incident of Hendra virus since it was first detected in 1994.

The Qld Horse Council stresses the need to be aware that Hendra virus can occur wherever there are flying foxes and horses, and because of the large area that flying foxes travel over, can occur across a large proportion of the state. For information about how you can reduce the risks to yourself and theirr horse please read our fact sheets:-

Bats & Trees http://www.horsecouncil.org.au/_Upload/Files/Bats%20and%20Trees.pdf
Hendra ˆ Property Design http://www.horsecouncil.org.au/_Upload/Files/Hendra%20Property%20Design.pdf
Hendra Virus ˆ Reducing the Risk http://www.horsecouncil.org.au/_Upload/Files/Hendra%20Reducing%20the%20Risk.pdf

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Three cases of KULIN VIRUS - MOSQUITO BORNE DISEAS E - found in WA . 20th May 2011

Kunjin virus confirmed as cause of neurological disease in three WA horses
The Department of Agriculture and Food’s Animal Health Laboratories have confirmed three recent
cases of neurological disease in horses in Western Australia were caused by Kunjin virus, which is
spread by infected mosquitoes.
Acting Chief Veterinary Officer Peter Morcombe said the affected horses were from areas north and
east of Perth and in the Goldfields.
He said Kunjin virus was commonly found in mosquitoes in the Kimberley and the Pilbara and it was
unusual to find horses affected by the virus outside of these areas.
“At this stage, the department does not expect to see many more cases of affected horses as
mosquito numbers should decline with cooler weather,” Dr Morcombe said.
“Only a very small number of horses develop signs after infection with Kunjin virus. However, horse
owners are advised to watch for signs of neurological disease in their horses, such as stopping
eating, depression, lethargy, a stiff gait, lack of coordination and falling over.
“Horses with Kunjin disease are not contagious to people, other horses or other animals, however
horse owners should contact their private veterinarian or district veterinary officer from the
Department immediately if their horse shows neurological signs. Veterinarians can advise on
diagnosis, protective clothing and other issues related to neurological diseases in horses.
“Horse handlers and veterinarians are always advised to wear personal protective equipment
whenever handling horses with neurological signs.”
Dr Morcombe also recommended that horse owners reduce their horses’ exposure to mosquitoes
where possible.
“Eliminating mosquito breeding sites, trapping, housing horses between dusk and dawn, turning off
lights inside stables, using fluorescent lights, screening stable windows, fogging and using fans and
automatic overhead misting systems will all reduce the chance of mosquitoes biting your horses and
subsequent infection,” Dr Morcombe said.
“Registered insect repellents, rugs, hoods and mesh fly veils with ear covers and fly boots are also
recommended.”
Dr Morcombe said the neurological signs in the WA cases were similar to those seen this year in
eastern Australia, which have been attributed to Murray Valley Encephalitis and Kunjin virus
following flooding and increased mosquito activity in those areas.
For more information on neurological disease in horses, contact the department’s Animal Health
Laboratories on 9368 3351.

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MOSQUITO BORNE DISEASE - UNUSUAL NEUROLOGICAL SIGNS - 3RD APRIL 2011                             
Growing number of horses struck down by unusual illness
The AVA are warning horse owners to take precautions against mosquito borne disease, as Veterinarians report a growing number of horses with unusual neurological signs in New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia.

"These cases are still under investigation, however they may result from infection with a mosquito borne virus in the Kunjin-West Nile group," said Dr Christine Smith, President-Elect of the Equine Veterinary Association.

"Clinical signs may include depression and mild colic. These may also include the onset of neurological signs including increased responsiveness to touch and sound, facial paralysis and difficulty masticating, hypermetria in forelimbs and weakness in hindquarters, general ataxia and/or recumbency.

"Most of the horses involved appear to be recovering slowly, however there have also been reports a few deaths," said Dr Smith.
The NSW Department of Industry and Investment requests bloods samples (serum and heparin) be submitted to the relevant laboratory, and follow up blood samples at 7 days and 3 weeks after the onset of clinical signs. All of the horses tested by the NSW Department of Industry and Investment thus far have been negative for Hendra virus, however veterinarians should follow PPE protocols when examining sick animals.

There are a range of products available including fly veils and registered chemical treatments to help protect horses from insect bites. It is also advisable to trying to keep horses inside during dawn and dusk to help reduce their exposure to mosquitoes.
If a horse is exhibiting these clinical signs the owner should consult a veterinarian immediately.

The Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) is the national professional association of veterinary surgeons in Australia.
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STATE TRAILS CONFERENCE - 1ST APRIL 2011                             
The 2011 State Trails Conference is being held on the 1st April in Perth. The conference is run by the Department of Environment and Conservation and the Department of Sport and Recreation and is attended by people interested
in walking and bike riding trails.
This year ATHRA WA will make a short presentation about multi-purpose trails,
specifically with horse access. It is important that as many horse people attend
and show your interest in horse access!!
Please contact Steve. bennett@dsr.wa.gov.au

Following the trails conference there will be an informal  Special Horse Access Sundowner Meeting at the Como Hotel on Canning Highway at 6pm for all people interested in horse access issues.
ATHRA WA has been working in partnership with Department of Environment and Conservation Visitor Services to draft a WA Horse Trail Strategy.    Anna Sheehan on 0412 926 932 or email aasheehan@iinet.net.au

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NATIONAL HORSE ORGANISATIONS WELCOME AGREEMENT

In a joint statement, representatives of four national horse organisations today welcomed news that agreement had been reached, that will enable them to formally sign the Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) in early March.

The four bodies to sign the EADRA on behalf of the racing, performance and recreation
sectors are:
• Australian Racing Board
• Harness Racing Australia
• Australian Horse Industry Council
• Equestrian Australia.

A meeting of all Australian governments and major livestock industries last week agreed that the horse industry should be admitted to the EADRA – providing greater certainty inrapidly mounting a response to a future exotic disease affecting horses. Under this
agreement, the Commonwealth Government is committed to underwrite industry’s share of the costs of an emergency response, enabling swift and effective action to control and eradicate a disease threat.

After extensive consultation coordinated by Animal Health Australia during the past 12 months, organisations representing a clear majority of horse owners have reached agreement about an acceptable funding mechanism to meet industry’s share of the costs of
an emergency response. Under this arrangement, a levy will only be imposed after an actual disease emergency, when the response is finished.

The leaders of the four national horse bodies have warmly welcomed the endorsement of all signatories to the (EADRA).
“This has been a long journey, but we are delighted that the final goal is now in sight. This historic and unprecedented agreement does demonstrate how important the health and welfare of their animals are to all horse owners.”
“The 2007 equine influenza outbreak showed how an exotic disease incursion can have widespread consequences for all sectors of the horse industry. This agreement is an important step in providing a greater level of protection and certainty for all horses and
their owners.”

The CEO of Animal Health Australia, Dr Mike Bond, acknowledged the outstanding efforts of the four horse industry organisations, together with many representatives of the key recreational sectors to reach this point of consensus.
“The Australian horse-owning community is very diverse and communications are often difficult – especially at a grass-roots level. Many people in dozens of organisations have worked hard to ensure that there was effective consultation with their members. This was a crucial part of the submission that was made to the Commonwealth Government on behalf of industry by Animal Health Australia.”
The formal agreement is expected to be signed in March, in a ceremony at Parliament House, Canberra.

CONTACTS:
Australian Racing Board: Andrew Harding (02) 9551-7700 Mobile 0417 043 233
Harness Racing Australia: Andrew Kelly (03) 9867-8033 Mobile 0488-358-285
Australian Horse Industry Council: Roger Lavelle (03) 5429 1682 Mobile 0428-996-328
Equestrian Australia: Grant Baldock (02) 8762-7777 Mobile 0414-307-184
Animal Health Australia: Thea McNaught-Reynolds, (02) 6203 3942 Mobile 0411 504 727

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TAX RELIEF FOR BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY NATURAL DISASTERS - FLOODS AND BUSHFIRES- Feb 2011


Australian Taxation Office


Tax Professionals

To: BRIDIE CONROY  Client ID: 6780001.

11 February 2011

Extra time to lodge for those affected by natural disaster

We will give all individuals and businesses, affected by natural disasters in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia (including those affected by the recent bushfires in Western Australia) additional time for tax-related lodgments and some associated payments.

Those in the affected postcodes will automatically have the following deferrals applied to their lodgment due dates, if the lodgments have not yet been received:

  • 21 March 2011 for December 2010 and January 2011 monthly activity statements, including those businesses who have previously received an automatic natural disaster-related deferral for their December 2010 monthly activity statement, if they still reside within the affected postcodes
  • 28 March 2011 for 2010-11 quarter 2 activity statements (this does not apply to large pay as you go withholders)
  • 28 March 2011 for any other lodgments (including income tax returns) originally due on 28 February 2011.  

The associated payment dates for all lodgments listed above will also be deferred accordingly.

Lodgment of quarterly superannuation guarantee charge statements has also been automatically deferred from 28 February 2011 to 28 March 2011. Please note, we do not have the authority to defer the due date for payment. If employers have missed their payments they should contact us.

You do not need to apply for these deferrals and if later deferrals have already been granted, these still apply. The update to ATO systems will take some days to complete for each individual or business but it will occur before 21 March.

If you need further additional time to lodge and pay you will need to contact us. Similarly, if you or your clients face other lodgment or payment obligations in the coming weeks and you need additional time, phone us on 13 72 86 Fast Key Code 5 before any due dates.

If you have been affected by the natural disasters and receive any correspondence from us that you or your clients are not ready to deal with, contact us and we will make special arrangements for you.
More information

Further information is available on our website at www.ato.gov.au:

Annamaria Carey
Assistant Commissioner
Tax Practitioner and Lodgment Strategy

BUSHFIRE ASSISTANCE UPDATE (WAHC)- Final notification- 8th February 2011  
THE COUNCIL FEELS THAT THERE HAVE BEEN SUFFICIENT OFFERS OF HELP IN THESE UPDATES AND WE WOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS OUR GRATITUDE TO EVERYBODY WHO HAS OFFERED ASSISTANCE TO THOSE PEOPLE AND HORSES WHO SUFFERED IN THE BUSHFIRES – THIS WILL BE THE FINAL UPDATE – HOWEVER, ANY  FURTHER OFFERS OF ASSISTANCE - WILL BE KEPT  IN CASE IT BECOMES NECESSARY TO PASS THEM ON  -  IF ANYONE REQUIRES HELP AT A LATER DATE – PLEASE CONTACT DIANE BENNIT, CHAIR WAHC 92910202  0409083617

FINAL   UPDATE
Midnight Tuesday 8th February
Dolly van Zaane,  Chittering -  can take up to 12 horses  and has accommodation for several people  95714525  
Brigit Bachs,  Darling Downs – one small paddock for 2 horses and can feed hay for the short term –also has a double horse float and can pick up if required. 0407154739
Tony Sprlyan,  Mariginup -  paddock, round yard for 2 horses, has a float – they are happy to take dogs   0408937054
Alison Hume,  Wanneroo  -  2 large grassed paddocks, would suit up to 15 horses that could be kept together – 2 stables, 1 yard 0410545104   -  Janelle 0411755201
Greg Johnson,  West Swan  -  can take up to 10 horses and float up to 12 whenever required   0418948855
Wendy Reid,  Mandurah – can take 2 horses  95821100

REGISTER ON THE WAHC FREE  EMERGENCY DATA BASE –  THERE ARE REGULAR UPDATES ON ALL WA EMERGENCY OR BIO SECURITY SITUATIONS -  LOG ON TO    WWW.WAHORSEEMERGENCY.COM.AU

PREVIOUS   UPDATE
9.30am. Tuesday 8th February
James Berry  West Swan   - up to 6 horses, accommodation and a 3 horse float, can pick up  0409298092
Louise Atkinson  Bullsbrook – 2 paddocks, yards, short term   self  contained  accommodation – one room, 3 beds, kitchen bathroom  95712575
The offer of a house, yards and stables is available – situated 30 minutes north east of Midland – ring the WAHC  92910202  for details.

PREVIOUS   UPDATE
4.30pm  Monday 7th February 2011

The WAHC has been requested by the Dept of Emergency Management to provide the WAHC contact details to the Dept of Environment and Conservation – who will pass the information on to the FESA Bushfire Communications Centre to give out to people who need assistance.

Toni Leahy-Fripp Kenwick – paddock space for 3 to 4 horses 0435690303
Claire,   Santora Arabians  5 minutes from Armadale, on Southwest Highway  – large paddock, all new fencing 0419545476
Sandra Button,  Mundaring – up to 3 horses and a spare double room    95722367     0419947870
Robyn Cottman  Henley Brook – can accommodate 4 horses has a double horse float and is prepared to transport horses if required  0422808776
Pineview Stables,  Wanneroo -  can take up to 10 horses and have 2 double horses floats  0408005378
Carol,  Mundaring – 2 secure bare paddocks available, can provide hay short term  92953889
Nic Easton,  Goosebery Hill – double horse float available Wk 94545479   0415183544

PREVIOUS  UPDATE
9.30pm Sunday 6th February 6, 2011
Janice Keelan at Cardup – has accommodation for two people and one horse 95254277
Sharon Joyce in West Swan – has yards available 0417964689
Suzi Dickson – has a large aviary available for birds and accommodation for pets  0457088980
Kelly Webb,   Henley Brook – up to 10 horses, 2 and 3 horse float can pick up if required  0414508420
Cherilyn Wright,   Bullsbrook – 0437679206

PREVIOUS UPDATE
SUNDAY 6TH FEBRUARY
Alison Logan – Academy Equestrian  Wanneroo has  stables and yards available 0418681529
Tim and Debbie Wright –Bullsbrook  have already rescued 4 horses – they have two floats and are ready to assist in more rescues – they also have yards and paddocks available  0418880331
Nikki Brooks – Brookleigh Equestrian Estate, Brigadoon – yards and bunkhouse accommodation available   0412777377

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IMPORTANT  CHANGES  TO  THE  WAHC  CARNARVON  FINANCIAL RELIEF  FUND
As most people would be aware, the Western Australian Horse Council (WAHC)  started a financial relief fund for the Carnarvon Horse Community who had been affected by the recent devastating floods.

The Carnarvon Horse Community is made up of individual horse owners, a Pony Club, Adult Riding Club, Horseman’s Club, agistment centres and the Carnarvon Turf Club.
The Chair of the Group contacted the Council on Friday 14th and said that they felt Queensland’s situation was far worse than theirs, and they would like any monies collected on their behalf, to be forwarded to a similar fund in Queensland.
The Group also asked the Council to extend their sincere gratitude to all the people who have already donated to the fund, and those who have offered agistment, equipment and feed.
They also said that they plan to ‘adopt’ one of the  Queensland Pony Clubs, and fund raise for them.  This generosity from a group of people, who have already been seriously disadvantaged themselves, is absolutely astonishing and restores your faith in human nature.

We have contacted the Queensland Horse Council (QHC) who operate and follow the same guidelines that the WAHC does.  Their fund is open to the Horse Community in Qld. PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE TO BE A MEMBER OF THE QHC TO APPLY FOR ASSISTANCE

As the focus of the fund has now changed from the Carnarvon Horse Community to the Queensland Horse Community, anyone wishing to have their donation returned, should contact the WAHC. The Council feels that it is unnecessary to close the existing account and open one for Qld, so donations can continue to  be made at any branch of the Westpac Bank – the account name is Western Australian Horse Council (Inc) - Carnarvon Horse Community Flood Relief Fund – BSB/Account No  036032 / 409825

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SUSPECTED STRANGLES OUTBREAK - WAHC notification 2 - 17th August 2010
The second update from the Western Australian Horse Council regarding the suspected cases of Strangles in the Wanneroo area.
The following information was sourced by WA Horse Council committee person Dr Kathy Klein (Chair of our Bio-security and Horse Welfare Portfolio)
A veterinarian generally will diagnose a case of strangles based on the classical clinical signs. The gold standard to confirm the infection is a bacteriologic culture from either nasal or pharyngeal swabs or pus from the abscesses. Another test is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which detects the DNA of Streptococcus equi(S Equi). Without clinical pathology there can be no confirmation of the bacteria involved and there are other bacteria (particularly S. Zooepidemicus ) that can cause very similar clinical signs.

VetPath Laboratory Services pathologists confirmed today that there has been no indications of an outbreak of S. Equi but that since the bacteria is present in the horse population there are occasional cases of S Equi cultured. The horses in Wanneroo were not cultured and were diagnosed on clinical signs alone. VetPath did not receive any samples from the Vet Practice that attended these horses.

Dr John Creeper, a veterinary pathologist at the Animal Health Laboratory (Ag Dept WA) confirmed that they have received no samples for post mortem or culture from infected horses. They have been answering calls all day today and have advised people to seek veterinary advice if they are concerned about their horses. They have no additional information regarding this problem.
For more information please see :
http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/content/pw/ah/dis/ol/f10401.pdf

From the Client Services and Communications Officer, Animal Health Laboratories
Dept.of Agriculture and Food, South Perth.

Dear Kathy
The Department has not received formal notification of a Strangles outbreak. We are advising people that if they have any concerns about their animal’s health to contact their Vet. (It is not a notifiable disease and is treatable.) There has been no stock movement order put in place by the department. (It seems that rumours with the involvement of internet and email have run wild.)
Vicki Hales


The WA Horse Council recommends horse owners maintain best practice bio-security measures at all times, eg washing hands, isolate new arrivals from resident horses for at lease 14 days, quarantine horses that show signs of illness, keep stables clean and disinfected, ensure each horse has its own feed and water buckets, do not allow a horse to eat other horses feed etc.

To receive direct notification and ongoing information about any disease or equine emergency, register on www.wahorseemergency.com.au - this is a free service provided by the WA Horse Council for the horse industry.
The information supplied for the www.wahorseemergency.com.au database is private and only used for the dissemination of updating the progress of an Emergency Disease, Quarantine regulations and Bio-security information.

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SUSPECTED STRANGLES OUTBREAK- WAHC notification 1 - August 15th 2010
The Western Australian Horse Council would like to pass on the following information concerning the suspected outbreak of Strangles in the Wanneroo area.

Strangles is endemic in WA and it is not unusual to see cases from time to time. Strangles is rarely fatal.
Strangles is an upper respiratory tract infection – symptoms can include a thick creamy nasal discharge, an elevated temperature and lymph nodes under the throat may be enlarged.
Diagnostic testing in a laboratory, to confirm a case of Strangles (strep.equis) may take several days.

The horses that died recently in Yanchep were not as a result of having Strangles.

In WA under state law Strangles is not a notifiable disease
The Department of Agriculture has not implemented a lockdown – the WA border has not been closed
An initial or first course of Strangles vaccination may take some time to achieve full immunity
Vaccinating for Strangles does not prevent horses from getting Strangles, but it does lessen the effect.

The WAHC recommends horse owners maintain best practice bio-security measures at all times, eg washing hands, isolate new arrivals from resident horses for at least 14 days, quarantine that show signs of illness, keep stables clean and disinfected, ensure each horse has its own feed and water buckets, do not allow horse to eat other horses feed etc

To receive direct notification and ongoing information about any disease or equine emergency, register on www.wahorseemergency.com.au – this is a free service the WAHC provides for the horse industry. The information supplied for the database is private and only used for the dissemination of updating the progress of an Emergency Disease, quarantine regulations and bio-security information.

Diane Bennit – Chair WA Horse Council -92910202

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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - Aug 2010
The AGM was held at BROOKLEIGH EQUESTRIAN ESTATE in the Conference Room in the Barn on Wednesday 11th August - 7.30pm.
GUEST SPEAKERS will include:
KELVIN FREDERICKS – Southern Stars Saddlery - Point Two Air Jacket, which inflates in the event of a fall.
JENNY MANUEL SRG Corp - Equestrian Insurance
NAOMI MURRAY – Update on microchipping of horses.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING REPORT
The AGM was well attended and was chaired by well known racing and equestrian personality, Fin Powrie, for the election of the 2010 committee. All 2009 committee members stood for re-election and were joined by Gill Woodstock, Fran Stephens and Janet Innes. Minute Taking secretary, Naomi Briggs, was retained for 2010. The positions and portfolios will be decided at the first committee meeting in September.

Diane Bennit was nominated for a life membership to the WAHC for her role in developing the council over the years.

Once the business was completed the guest speakers were introduced.
Dr David Cook, a forensic entomologist and Kate Goh representing the stable Fly Action Group discussed the latest information regarding the blood sucking Stable Fly (Stromoxys calcitrans) and future restrictions on the use of raw poultry manure in all affected areas. For more information go to www.stableflyactiongroup.org.au

Kelvin Fredericks from Southern Star Saddlery gave a very interesting demonstration of the the Two Point Air Jacket, which, when used with a BETA level 3 body protector improves protection to the spine by up to 69% and with or without the body protector reduces the risk of rib fractures and underlying organ damage by as much as 20%. The Air jacket is attached to the saddle by a cord, which when rider and saddle go their separate ways, inflates the jacket in .1 of a second (a bit like an air bag in the car). The video of horrendous falls showed the Two Point Air Jacket inflating during falls and riders walking away from the incidents.

Jenny Manuel from SRG Corporation asked for three questions on insurance but found that the attendees had many more than this on the topic of insurance for themselves, their equine businesses and their horses

Dr Kathy Kline stepped in to present the talk on Microchipping and property identification codes when Naomi Murray was hospitalised. The need for these procedures was highlighted during the Equine Influenza outbreak in 2008 to create a clearer identification system that is universal for all horses and equine properties Australia wide.

2010 WAHC PRESIDENT'S REPORT
THE WA HORSE COUNCIL IS A UNIQUE ORGANISATION - IT IS NOT INVOLVED IN ANY ACCREDITING OF OFFICIALS, RUNNING OF EVENTS OR UTILISING VENUES. THE COUNCIL WAS FORMED TO REPRESENT THE HORSE INDUSTRY WITH LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERALGOVERNMENTS  - ON ANY ISSUES THAT AFFECT IT - AND THESE ARE MANY............

OUR MISSION STATEMENT IS TO HAVE THE INTERESTS OF HORSE OWNERS RECOGNISED BEFORE LOCAL COUNCILS AND GOVERNMENTS DECISIONS ARE MADE AND POLICIES FORMULATED.

WE HAVE A NUMBER OF PORTFOLIOS, THAT THE 15 PEOPLE ON THE COMMITTEE  - WHO COME FROM ALL AREAS OF THE HORSE INDUSTRY  - ARE INVOLVED IN, AND IT WILL GIVE YOU SOME IDEA OF THE COMMITTMENT OF THESE PEOPLE WHEN I TELL YOU THAT THEY HAVE ALL AGREED TO RENOMINATE.

WHILE THERE IS NOT TIME TO UPDATE YOU ON EACH PERSON’S SPECIAL SKILLS AND PROJECTS - I WOULD LIKE TO MAKE SPECIAL MENTION OF OUR VICE CHAIRPERSON ALAN PARKER FOR HIS WRITING OF THE THREE PAGE SUBMISSION THAT WE WERE INVITED TO SEND TO THE ‘SENATE STANDING COMMISSION FOR RURAL AND REGIONAL AFFAIRS AND TRANSPORT’ REGARDING THE WAHC  POSITION ON THE EADRA LEVY AND ALSO HIS ONGOING WORK WITH THE EMERGENCY CONTACT DATA BASE; PUBLICITY OFFICER SANDY HANNAN WHO HAS ORGANISED THE WAHC WEBSITE;   ROBERT HAWES AN EXPERT IN ‘GOVERNMENT SPEAK’ WHEN WE NEED TO WRITE THOSE TYPES OF LETTERS; MICHELLE WILKIE FOR EDITING AND SETTING UP THE NEWSLETTER; JANET CAMERON FOR HER TIME AND EFFORT IN SETTING UP A WAHC TRAIL TALK - HOME/DOMAIN PAGE ON THE STATE WA TRACKS AND TRAILS WEBSITE; NIKKI BROOKS WHO IS REPRESENTING THE HORSE INDUSTRY ON THE ‘PERTH REGIONAL NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT GROUP’ - AND HAS COORDINATED A NUMBER OF FREE ‘BEST PRACTICE’ FIELD DAYS - WITH UP TO 60 PEOPLE ATTENDING.

THE WAHC ARE WORKING WITH DAFF & RWWA TO SET UP A DATABASE OF CONTACTS TO RECEIVE THE HORSE ALERT WA FREE BIOSECURITY DOCUMENT THAT WILL BE OUT SHORTLY.

WAHC HAS ALSO SUPPORTED THE ACTION GROUPS INVOLVED IN:-
BANNING THE SLAUGHTERING OF HORSES  FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION; 
ALLOWING HORSES TO USE WHITFORD’S BEACH;
PREVENTING THE ONGOING USE OF RAW CHICKEN MANURE TO REDUCE THE  STABLE FLY PROBLEM;
ASSISTING THE MAGENUP EQUESTRIAN CENTRE TO IMPROVE THE SURFACE OF THEIR ARENA;
PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF PARKING LICENCE PERMITS AND FEES FOR EQUESTRIAN VEHICLES IN THE CITY OF SWAN;
SUPPORTING EWA IN THEIR BID TO HOLD THE MAGIC MILLIONS YEARLING SALES AT THE SEC.

WE ARE WORKING WITH THE AHIC AND AHA ON EI VOLUNTARY VACCINATION AND THE HORSE INDUSTRY BECOMING A SIGNATORY TO EADRA.

THE COUNCIL HAS REPRESENTATION ON A NUMBER OF GOVERNMENT COMMITTEES - AND IN MANY CASES IS THE ONLY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE HORSE INDUSTRY 
SOME OF THEM ARE:-

THE WA STATE TRAILS GRANTS ASSESSMENT PANEL;
THE ANIMAL EMERGENCY GROUP - WHICH RESCUES PETS AND HORSES IN PERI-URBAN AND RURAL SHIRES;
PERTH REGIONAL NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT GROUP;
THE SWAN RIVER TRUST ON MANAGEING HORSE WASTE IN THE HEALTHY RIVERS ACTION PLAN;
DEPARTMENT OF SPORT AND REC COMMITTEE WHO ARE SETTING GUIDELINES FOR THE ACCREDITATION OF TRAILS -  AND MANY MORE.

THE COUNCIL’S EQUESTRIAN RADIO SHOW TALKING HORSES ON 91.3 SPORTFM IS PROVING TO BE A VERY SUCCESSFUL MEDIUM FOR GETTING INFORMATION OUT TO THE HORSE INDUSTRY - WE HAVE BEEN ASKED TO EXTEND TO AN HOUR AND A HALF -  TALKING HORSES WILL BE CHANGING FROM TUESDAYS TO WEDNESDAYS ON 6TH OCTOBER FROM 6 to 7.30 PM . 

I WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE ONE OF OUR MEMBERS - SUE HURT -  FROM THE SWAN VALLEY PROGRESS ASSOCIATION WHO HAS BEEN NOMINATED FOR THE SUNDAY TIMES 2010 PRIDE OF AUSTRALIA AWARD FOR HER SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY.

WELCOME TO NEW WAHC MEMBERS PCAWA AND THE AUST TRAIL HORSE RIDERS ASSOC.

THANK YOU TO THE COMMITTEE, WHO ALL HAVE PROPER JOBS - AND GIVE THEIR  ‘SPARE TIME’ TO ASSISTING THE HORSE INDUSTRY.   IT IS TRULY AMAZING WHAT THE COUNCIL HAS BEEN ABLE TO ACHIEVE.

ON BEHALF OFTHE COUNCIL, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY HOW MUCH WE APPRECIATE ALL THOSE WHO SUPPORT US BY BECOMING MEMBERS - AND GIVING DONATIONS - THESE ARE THE ONLY SOURCE OF INCOME THAT WE HAVE. 

WITH YOUR SUPPORT THE COUNCIL CAN CREATE A STRONG, CLEAR VOICE ON ISSUES THAT AFFECT EVERYONE INVOLVED WITH HORSES AND ENSURE A SECURE FUTURE FOR THE HORSE INDUSTRY.

DIANE BENNIT - WAHC CHAIRPERSON 2010

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EQUINE HERPES VIRUS IN TASMANIA- Aug 2010

Equine herpes virus type 1 (EHV1) (abortigenic and neurological strains) - A recent outbreak of EHV1 in Tasmanian homebred mares where over 30% were affected including one death and several abortions, should remind Tasmanian horse owners to be aware of this disease. EHV1 is generally thought to be uncommon in the Tasmanian horse population although abortion that is highly suspicious of EHV1 is regularly reported in mares introduced from the mainland. EHV1 can be excreted by previously infected horses when they are stressed eg by transport or entering a new group. Care must be taken to keep introduced horses isolated from pregnant mares on your property. This includes not sharing water troughs, feed bins and other gear and not permitting over-the-fence contact. EHV1 can be easily spread by contact with aborted foetuses and associated materials so cleaning up after an abortion is a high priority. Vaccination is available as an aid in the control of EHV1 abortion, however vaccine alone will not prevent abortions. Your veterinarian should be consulted as a matter of urgency if you suspect EHV1 infection on your property so a management plan can be initiated as soon as possible to limit losses. EHV1 is a notifiable disease.
See more details about Equine Herpes at : http://www.horsecouncil.org.au/_Upload/Files/Equine%20Herpes.pdf

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HORSE INDUSTRY LEVY- July 2010
Horse owners ensuring an emergency response
The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA) and the horse industry

Why do we need a levy?
If a serious disease occurs that affects horses (called an ‘emergency animal disease’ in the EADRA) and a major campaign is needed to get it under control, the horse community decides the maximum amount of money it will contribute as its share for combating the disease. This is 1% of the Gross value Product (GVP) for an animal sector.

The most recent estimations of the GVP value for the horse sector is $3 billion dollars so 1% is $30 million.
Because no one knows how much the total cost will be to combat a disease until the campaign is over, and the disease is eradicated or controlled , the Australian Government underwrites the response for the animal sector (it puts the money up front). The Government does this because it knows, because of the EADRA deed, that the animal sector has already decided how it would repay its share of the debt.

The levy is a debt repayment option because almost all animal sectors do not have the money to repay the debt immediately. The levy is only collected after the share of the animal sector’s debt is determined by Animal Health Australia. All the costs of a disease campaign have to be justified before they are included in the debt amount calculation.

Depending upon what resources were required to remove or control the disease, the debt may be any amount up to the maximum amount determined at the beginning of the campaign The maximum levy collection period is 10 years. It may take less than this period to pay off the debt.

When will the levy collection start?
.
The present decision by the horse community is that the levy be an Emergency Disease levy and it is ‘zero rated’. This means the legislation to allow the collection of the levy is put into place (how to collect the levy when needed) but no levy is to be collected until the process described above occurs – there is a emergency animal disease outbreak, EADRA is activated, there is a campaign to remove or control the disease, a debt is generated that the animal sector is required to repay.

Will the levy on the horse community be raised every time EADRA is activated?

No. The levy will only become operational if the debt is to pay for a disease campaign to combat a disease that affects horses. There are 22 diseases listed in EADRA which can affect horses. For some of these diseases, the Government will pay all of the costs, in others either the horse community pays its share alone or it pays a share together with other animal sectors.

We have had only one major emergency animal disease outbreak affecting horses within the last 30 years that has required the resources required to activate EADRA.

Levy options

A range of levy options have been suggested by the horse community via email to the Australian Horse Industry Council, through web-based forums, as decisions at formal meetings of horse sector associations and by direct email contact to this office. Approximately 400 associations and individuals made contact. Thank you everybody for the time and effort put into these responses.

Every option suggested has been evaluated with the Horse Levy Working Group against the following guidelines.
* The legality of the option as a levy (does it comply with the Australian Government requirements).
* The definition for the levy option. The horse community, the supplier of the option and the government all need to be very clear about what the levy option is.
* How equitable is the levy option across the horse community. With an animal sector as diverse as the horse community, we took notice of the options you considered to be fair for a large proportion of the horse industry.
* How many units are there on which a levy can be placed – the greater the number of units, the less the actual levy per unit when it is required..
* How many ‘levy collection points’ are there? A levy collection point is the place where the levy money is collected to be remitted to the Government. The cost to collect a levy is as important as the number of units. The aim is to have a levy option which minimises ‘red tape’ and is relatively low cost to collect. If there are too many collection points, then this increases the cost of collection. As a rule of thumb, less than 200 levy collection points can be cost effective and manageable. The cost of collection will also be met by the industry sector.
* The number of unknowns about the levy options. We could not determine or even estimate the number of units or collection points for some options. There just isn’t any information available.
* Horse community attitude to the levy option. Some levy options had strong support by some sectors and very negative responses from others. This didn’t eliminate an option from the list because we have to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of every levy option. The only reason why options were eliminated was because they are not legal options for a levy.

The levy options, in order of preference by the horse community respondents are:

1. Horse wormers – Products that include pastes, pellets, liquid formulations and other products defined and registered by the Australian Pesticide and Veterinary Medicine Authority to treat internal parasites in horses. Reliable figures available on the number of units sold each year. All levy collection points identifiable and considerably less than 200
Respondents considered this option covered all sectors of the community, even though the usage varied between horse owners.
Regarded as a good base levy to combine with other options.

2. Manufactured horse feed
– a product that is modified, an adulterated feed or specialist supplement that is produced and marketed for equines or identified as an equine specific consumable product. This definition does not currently include chaff products or specialist mineral additives. Reliable production figures but estimates on usage by the horse sector. Majority of levy collection points identifiable and less than 200. Increasing usage of manufactured feed by some horse sectors.

3. Registration – definition not yet finalised but would include sectors with mandatory registration of horses or members.
Reliable figures on horse numbers from some sectors, estimates from others. Some figures on membership from few sectors.
Number of levy collection points unknown.

4. Horse shoes

Approximate figures on usage available. Levy collection points are identifiable Usage by some sectors, declining usage described by some respondents.

5. Events - no agreed definition on what constitutes a ‘unit’ to be levied. No reliable data on number of units or levy collection points.

6. Microchips Electronic device
used to identify the ownership of a horse with data contained in a database. Very few units currently available to be levied.

7. Slaughtered horses
– horses consigned for human consumption to domestic or export markets. Very few units compared to other options. Already levied ($5 per horse) for chemical residue testing.

8. Horse gear - no clear definition as to type of product. No data on number of units or levy collection points.
Two further options were suggested but, on advice, both were not considered as legal options for a levy. These are a levy on wagering and a levy on imported horses.

The Next Step - Circulate these options to your horse groups.

We’ll need you to discuss these options with your horse groups and give us feedback by the second week of August (week starting 9 August).

If you are holding a meeting:
Please make the EADRA and the levy an important item on any meeting of your organisation, society or committee agenda within the next 4 weeks and inform us of the discussion and outcomes of the meeting. To make sure that you capture all the relevant outcomes, please use the ‘proforma’ provided on our website (see weblink below and go to ‘Submission information’). By using the proforma you can ensure that all the information that the Government requires as evidence of your support is presented. If the matter has been recently discussed, please tell us the outcomes.

You can send the form back by:
email to Horse.EADRA@industry.nsw.gov.au - attention Dr Diane Ryan
fax to(02) 46406300
mail to: Dr Diane Ryan, Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute, PMB 4008, Narellan NSW 2567.

Where to get information?
The following link will take you to the relevant page on the website www.animalhealthaustralia.com.au
(or go to www.animalhealthaustralia.com.au and click on the Horse Industry and EADRA box)

Who to contact?

Do you have any other questions about this process? We can be contacted at:
Dr Diane Ryan, Regional Veterinary Officer, Industry & Investment NSW - Horse.EADRA@industry.nsw.gov.au
Dr Mike Bond, Animal Health Australia: mbond@animalhealthaustralia.com.au
Kim Percy, Animal Health Australia. KPercy@animalhealthaustralia.com.au

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HORSE INDUSTRY LEVY June 2010
Members of horse organizations throughout Australia and individual horse owners who are not members of any society need to be aware of the decision of the recent Primary Industries Ministerial Council (PIMC) that a deadline of 1 December 2010 has been set for the industry to show that it is prepared to support an EADRA. The proposed timeline for finalizing an EADRA submission is :
1. Define and choose the funding (cost recovery) options [30 June]
2. Undertake industry consultation process - Organisational and regional levels - Use of websites, possibly press advertisements, ‘road shows’ - Obtain letters of support from all relevant organisations, regional and national - Identify any ‘pockets’ of dissention/disagreement
[31 August] 3. Prepare final draft of industry submission [mid-October]
4. Obtain industry sign-off to final submission to Minister [mid-November]
5. [DAFF undertakes the assessment process, including legal advice, then providing advice to Minister]
6. Formal advice to PIMC [I December]
This agreement between all Australian governments (Federal, State and Territory) and the horse industry brings with it a certainty of a properly coordinated response to any disease outbreak listed in the agreement. There are 22 diseases listed. Most are going to have a far more dramatic impact on affected horses than seen with Equine Influenza (EI). Signing the EADRA also means that the industry has a role in deciding how a response is managed including monitoring of costs involved.
The EADRA also involves a cost sharing arrangement between Governments and industry. The proportion of the share depends on the nature of the disease in its impact on human health, the socio-economic consequences, and the affect on horses’ health and production losses.
Category 1 An example is Rabies. The Government share is 100% of costs.
Category 2 An example is Hendra virus. The Government share is 80% and industry 20%. Category 3 An example is African horse sickness. The Government and industry have an equal 50% share.
Category 4 An example is EI. The Government share is 20% and the industry pays 80%. Before the Government will sign EADRA they need to be convinced that any costs incurred in managing the disease outbreak can be recouped. This is done through a levy mechanism. The levy will initially be set at zero dollars and remain so until a disease occurs. Once the disease has been eradicated and proof of freedom established the costs are tallied. Once the industry’s share of the costs are known a levy figure is established and the levy collection process put into play. An industry is usually given 10 years in which to pay their share of costs. The interest charged and the audit costs have to come out of the levy monies. If it is a relatively small amount to repay the industry may wish to pay over a shorter period than 10 years.

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CLOSING WHITFORDS HORSE BEACH May 2010

In February, the Joondalup Council approved their release of a draft Beach Management Plan for a six-week public comment period. The City's comprehensive consultation ended on 6 April.
The draft plan has been developed in response to a number of complaints and petitions concerning issues like competing recreational activities on the beach, access to car parking, vandalism, anti-social behaviour and the condition of coastal paths.
The WAHC presented a submission asking them to reconsider the decision to close the Whitfords Beach to horses, and attending and addressing two rallies organized by the ‘Whitfords Horse Beach’ committee. Over 4600 responses were received to the draft beach management plan.
The views expressed, issues raised and results of the consultation will guide Elected Members in making a decision at a future Council meeting.
However, because of the amount of work required to process such a large number of submissions, it is anticipated that the results of the survey will not be presented to Council until later in the year.

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WA TRAILS CONFERENCE 2009
The WA Trails Conference 2009 was held at the Point Walter Conference and Recreation Centre in Bicton on Thursday 11th June. More than 100 people were in attendance from diverse range of interests in the trails community, however a Western Australian Horse Council delegate was the only representative of the equestrian industry.

Nyoongar elder May McGuire and Barry McGuire welcomed delegates to the conference. The conference was then opened by Ron Alexander, Director General of Sport and Recreation. In his opening address Mr Alexander made the point that a successful trail is one which people are passionate about and is well planned ensuring that the trail will be well used and maintained. He also said that one of the challenges is making people aware of the available trails to promote their use.

Tony Cook from Barrington Consulting Group then spoke about the 2009 – 2015 WA Trails Strategy. As peak industry body for the equestrian industry, the Western Australian Horse Council was consulted as one of the stakeholders in this report. Mr Cook pointed out that the previous strategy had not been taken up as it was too prescriptive, detailed and limited in scope. The new strategy addresses these considerations and is intended as a performance based document as opposed to the previous compliance based document.

The Peel Trail Master Plan Review was then presented by Cr Shonagh Bradstock. Cr Bradstock is a ministerial appointee to the Trails Reference Panel and explained the Best Practice Model of the Peel Trails Group. Shonagh’s motto is “We have to do something – we can’t just do nothing”. Shonagh was a very inspiring speaker who made you want to “do something”.

Brain Lloyd, a Pastoral Liaison Officer with the Pastoral Lands Office the spoke about pastoral leases and access to them by the public.

An update on the Top Trails Project was then given by Linda Daniels and Vanessa Bradshaw. This project is set to be launched September/October this year. The WAHC has been an active participant in this project.

A very interesting presentation “From Wreck Creation to Recreation” – the trail bike issue, was given by Steve Pretzel from the Recreational Trail Bike Riders Association. Steve shared some of the thinking behind their approach to an issue that has resisted solution for several decades (and will I suspect for some time to come!!).

Sue Campbell from EMRC was the final speaker, talking about Perth’s Eastern Region Trails Activities. It was interesting that that NO equestrian trail events were scheduled. The Perth Hills Trails Masterplan is currently being developed for the shires of Mundaring and Kalamunda.

Finally a panel discussion was held with the members of the panel being Hon Barry House MLC, Mike Wood (Bib Track), Cr Shonagh Bradstock, Jim Krynen (cycling). A variety of topics were discussed from how climate change will effect trails, corporate contributions to tracks and trails, public transport options for cycling.

The State Trails Conference is held annually and is free of charge. It is a great opportunity to learn about trails, meet a diverse variety of trails users and those people responsible for trails. If equestrian trails are to be maintained, our industry needs to show more interest. Currently we have a very limited voice in an increasingly competitive trails market place.

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DENTAL PRACTITIONERS - May 2009
Following a recent bogus survey people may have received, which is currently being looked into by the Equine Veterinary Association, we thought it timely to provide horse owners with information regarding equine dental practitioners in WA.

Most horse owners possibly will use an equine dentist at some stage, whether for regular or infrequent treatments. Most dentists in WA are not qualified according to Australian standards. Those who are not qualified tend to promote their procedure as only floating (filing) teeth which suits many people. However if they do find any ongoing issues, it is always advisable to obtain their vet’s opinion or contact a qualified dentist.

Members who seek out an equine dentist, should be aware that any person promoting an overseas qualification will find they are not recognized in Australia. This is because they hold no accreditation with any Government education body or university. Most attend private courses, run by individuals promoting their own ideas, which are not those of a Government run educational facility. Australia does have one course recognized and accredited by the Department of Education which has the support of both the Australian Veterinary Association and the Equine Veterinary Association.

Members should also be aware that both these bodies have their own in-house equine dental course and that some veterinary practitioners in WA have attended this course and promote equine dental work in their practice.

Members should not feel uncomfortable to question their regular dentist as to their qualifications and the educational body that recognizes their certificate. They can then be more aware of the standard of practice they are receiving.

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AUSTRALIAN HORSE INDUSTRY COUNCIL INC.
Basic information about Livestock Industry Levies - April 09

What are levies?
A levy is a way for animal owners to make a contribution towards the cost of various programs that
are run for the benefit of the industry. There is no other way for these programs to be funded.

Why are levies in place?
Monies collected from levy payments are used to pay for promotion and marketing, research and
development, disease management, biosecurity training, and any other program that benefits animals
and animal owners. Levy payments are also used to fund programs run by Animal Health Australia.

Who proposes levies?
A levy for a livestock industry is proposed by the industry after consultation with participants.

Who pays levies?
A levy is paid by animal owners.

When are levies paid?
A levy is paid by an animal owner at the same time as some other transaction involving animals or
animal products. For example, in the cattle and sheep industries a levy is paid at the same time as an
animal is sold, or when animal products (for example meat, milk, wool) are sold.

Who collects levies?
Levies are collected by an industry organisation which conducts transactions with animal owners. In
the cattle and sheep industries these organisations are livestock sellers, dairy companies, wool
brokers, and abattoirs. These organisations then consolidate all the individual levies collected and
send them on a regular basis to the Levies Revenue Service.

Is a levy paid at every specified transaction in other livestock industries?
Animal owners must contribute a levy amount at each specified transaction. The levy amount is
calculated the same way for each transaction and everybody in the industry operates under the same
rules. The requirement to make a levy contribution is independent of the economic value of the
transaction.

Is a levy still payable if the transaction is at a loss to the animal owner?
The requirement to pay a levy is triggered by the transaction and is still in place even if the transaction
is done at an economic loss to the animal owner.

Who oversights and audits levies?
The Australian Government legislates for, collects and distributes levies on behalf of the industry. This
is done by the Levies Revenue Service in the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.

Why does the horse industry need a levy?
The horse industry needs horse owners to contribute to various programs that are undertaken for the
benefit of the entire horse industry. Currently there is no industry wide funding of research and
development, promotion, education and training, animal welfare, or Animal Health Australia programs
which benefit all horse owners.

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EQUINE INDUSTRY GROUP CALLS FOR HALT TO URBAN ENCROACHMENT
More than 40 West Australian Equine Industry representatives converged on the State Equestrian Centre on Nov 30th for the inaugural meeting of an Equine Industry Advocacy and Advisory group. This group have called for harmonisation and collaborative thinking to tackle the issue of a rapidly expanding urban housing areas resulting in the closure of equestrian facilities and riding trails across the state.

Despite being an industry not traditionally known for its internal stakeholder co-operation, representatives from a wide range of key groups have banded together to tackle this issue and aim to complete an urgent and comprehensive investigation to assess the socio-economic value of the horse industry to the State, with estimates of in excess of $650 million per year. More than 40,000 West Australians rely on the Equine Industry for their livelihood.

Ron Fleming, President of Riding for the Disabled is quoted as saying, "There is a clear lack of understanding by government of the economic value of the Equine industry in WA." His thoughts have been echoed by Rose Pinter, Pony Club WA President stating, "Not only is there a gross under-estimate of the socio-economic value, there is clearly confusion about the structure and the needs of the wider equestrian community."

Martin Shaw, CEO of Equestrian WA identified that whilst the focus of groups within the industry may vary, a "unified approach and representative group" was desperately needed.

A number of well-established crucial facilities and access areas have been lost across the State in recent years due to urban sprawl as the demand for housing dramatically increases. This has forced hundreds of sporting clubs and recreation user groups to either relocate to venues that are under-developed, ill resourced and unsuitable or cease activity entirely.

Since the group was launched in August 2012, WAHC Chairperson, Diane Bennit has been contacted by a number of affected groups right around the state and she believes that the number of people that are currently affected by the threat of urban encroachment could easily exceed 20,000.

The group aims to tackle this by becoming the industry's representative and advisory peak body, able to provide advice to both affected parties and local and State Government bodies with current issues and also for the forward planning of facilities and access areas to allow for continued economic and social well-being growth in WA.  Further meetings scheduled in the Southern Metro area in January 2013.
Author:  Ben Verning, Executive Officer, Pony Club WA

CONTACT: If you would like more information on this topic, or to schedule an interview please contact WA Horse Council Chair Diane Bennit on 9291 0202 or bennit@iinet.net.au or Pony Club WA Executive Officer Ben Verning on 9296 1500 or office@pcawa.com