EQUINE HEALTH, WELFARE AND RESEARCH PORTFOLIO

 

HORSE RESCUED AT KENWICK May 2016
It took many hands, some creative thinking and a great deal of effort to rescue a 500 kilogram horse that had become mired in a boggy dam on Victoria Road, Kenwick earlier this month.

LARGE ANIMAL RESCUE WORKSHOP - APRIL 2015
The WA Hore Council presents this hands-on course for horse owners, equestrian groups and associated and emergency responders (shire rangers, police, veterinarians and fire and rescue services) to educate in the rescue of hroses and other large animals. COURSE - 11th and 12th june- only 50 spots available pplications close 1st May

SUGGESTED EVENT INCIDENT/ACCIDENT PROCEDURE - APRIL 2015
These Guidelines are not intended to, nor can they possibly, cover all contingencies – they are intended to help organizations understand how to be better prepared in managing any accidents that occur.

MYSTERY VIRUS IN WA - Aug 2013
Four properties were ientified in June 2013 as having horses that showed symptoms of smallpapules lumps) in the mouth and on the side of the tongue and showed mild ill-health signs. Reports indicated that some humans and other animals also developed the symptoms.

POSITIVE TEST FOR QLD HORSE TO RABIES LIKE LYCCAVIRUS - May2013
Biosecurity Queensland is quarantining a property on the Southern Downs after a horse tested positive to Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABLV).
Chief Biosecurity officer Dr Jim Thompson said the horse was euthanased on 11 May after falling ill. “It tested negative for Hendra virus infection but further testing returned a positive result for ABLV,” he said

HENDRA VIRUS: reducethe risk of the virus occurring in Western Australia- April 2013
“While the risk of Hendra virus occurring in WA is low, flying foxes north of Shark Bay have been shown to carry Hendra virus and horses in contact with them have some risk of becoming infected,” Dr Hawkins said.

Click to download PDF 66kb

HENDRA VIRUS: managing the risks in Western Australia- Feb 2013
By Dr Sue Skirrow, Emergency Animal Disease Preparedness manager
Download the Department of Ag Hendra Virus PDF

EMERGENCY HORSE HAVEN -FORMS Oct 2012
Form for registering as a TEMPORARY accommodation for horses and/or owners in the event of an emergency situation from fires, floods etc

ARE YOUR HORSES BEING TERRORISED BY STABLE (Biting ) FLIES ? 5/3/12

The Stable Fly Action Group (SFAG) and the Woodridge Community Association Inc (WCA) are jointly convening a Public Meeting, to be held at the Woodridge Community Hall, cnr King Drive and Indian Ocean Drive, Woodridge, on Monday 12 March 2012 at 7.00 pm.

Poster advertising the Public Meeting is attached for downloading . (PDF)


EMERGENCY HORSE HAVENS - ONGOING LISTING UPDATED 20.2.12
With the heat hitting city and regional areas of WA this year we have already seen our state ravaged by bushfires. Homes have been lost in the Margaret River area and fires have affected many other areas. Horse owners are offering temporary refuges for those who need to evacuate their horses from these areas.
Download Emergency Evacuation Venues .pdf and email to bennit@iinet.net.au to have your property included on the emergency temporary refuge list.

HORSES AND BUSHFIRES April 2011
The key to survival is forward planning and self reliance. BE PREPARED

EMERGENCY HORSE HAVENS- fires February2011
BUSHFIRE ASSISTANCE UPDATE (WAHC)- Final notification- 8th February 2011  
THE COUNCIL FEELS THAT THERE HAVE BEEN SUFFICIENT OFFERS OF HELP IN THESE UPDATES AND WE WOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS OUR GRATITUDE TO EVERYBODY WHO HAS OFFERED ASSISTANCE TO THOSE PEOPLE AND HORSES WHO SUFFERED IN THE BUSHFIRES – THIS WILL BE THE FINAL UPDATE – HOWEVER, ANY  FURTHER OFFERS OF ASSISTANCE - WILL BE KEPT  IN CASE IT BECOMES NECESSARY TO PASS THEM ON  -  IF ANYONE REQUIRES HELP AT A LATER DATE – PLEASE CONTACT DIANE BENNIT, CHAIR WAHC 92910202  0409083617

EMERGENCY EQUINE HAVENS
Response from Councils, Sept 09.
For details click title above.

BUSHFIRE PREPAREDNESS
Started April 2009.
For details click title above.

TEXAN TIPS TO PROTECT HORSES FROM WILDFIRE
August 21 2009
For details click title above.

EMERGENCY EQUINE HAVENS - March 2009
Started March 2009.
For details click title above.

THE WA HORSE EMERGENCY DATABASE
Started Feb 2008 - completed March 2009.
For details click title above.

BIO-SECURITY CONTINGENCY PLAN. Procedures for horse events
Started Sept 2007 - completed Nov 2007.
For details click title above.

AWARENESS PROGRAM - developing plans to prepare for disease.
For details click title above.


FULL DETAILS RE EVENTS BELOW

HORSE RESCUE AT KENWIC

No horsing around with difficult rescue

Friday 20 May 2016 – 12:00 PM

It took many hands, some creative thinking and a great deal of effort to rescue a 500 kilogram horse that had become mired in a boggy dam on Victoria Road, Kenwick earlier this month. 

The horse, Zed, had wandered over a recently fallen down fence and made his way over to the dam where he then became stuck up to his neck in the clay-like soil.

Once the trapped animal was reported, the Department of Fire and Emergency Services assembled a diverse team to undertake the rescue, including Fire and Rescue Service firefighters from the Perth and Maddington Stations, State Emergency Service (SES) Mounted Section volunteers, and an Urban Search and Rescue Officer. Local rangers and neighbours were also keen to pitch in and help.

Perth District Officer Mel Cooper said it was a great team effort in tackling an unusual situation.

“When the Maddington crew arrived the horse was exhausted and in shock,” Mel said.

“Diane Bennit from the WA Horse Council provided the Maddington crew with some technical advice over the phone and we also called on a vet to assess the horse before we tried to free it.

“Once we determined the best way to go about things firefighters dug around the horse and used water to loosen the mud.

“We then used hoses and long lines to make slings around it and we used a sideways drag technique similar to the Hampshire Skid technique developed in the UK, to manually haul the horse sideways out of the mud.

“We pulled the horse clear of the muddy area as far as practicable, and used another rescue technique involving the hoses in order to flip it over which assisted it to its feet.”

The rescue effort took around two hours to successfully free the horse.

Mel credited the rescue to the skills and knowledge of those involved, as well as everyone’s willingness to muck in and put their back into it.

“The SES Mounted Section volunteers have a wealth of horse knowledge and those who attended had recently completed the WA Horse Council large animal rescue training – their skills were put to good use with this rescue.”

A day after the incident Zed was faring well and was being monitored for any potential health issues.?

TO VIEW THE ARTICLE ONN the Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) website CLICK HERE

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EMERGENCY LARGE ANIMAL RESCUE COURSE

The Large Animal Rescue courses will be given by presenter MaryAnne Leighton from Queensland who is the co-author of the book Equine Emergency Rescue (A guide to large animal rescue) MaryAnne has run these types of courses for a number of years in the Eastern States and New Zealand, and numbers attending total nearly 1,000.
 
These June courses will be the first of their type in this State run by the WA Horse Council. The hands-on course is designed for horse owners, equestrian groups and associations, along with emergency department responders such as fire and rescue services, shire rangers, police and veterinarians etc. For those attending to have opportunity for hands on training the course is limited to 25 attendees per course. A certificate of participation for this training will be awarded.
 
Lunch and refreshments are provided for each course and a complimentary copy of Equine Emergency Rescue is provided to each attendee.
Applications including payment for places close on Friday May 1st, and can be booked through bennit@iinet.net.au.  For more information contact Diane Bennit  9293 3577
More information on what the course covers can be found at www.equineER.com

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Suggested Event, Incident/Accident Procedure - April 2015
These Guidelines are not intended to, nor can they possibly, cover all contingencies – they are intended to help organizations understand how to be better prepared in managing any accidents that occur.

POINTS TO CONSIDER

· Is a veterinarian and doctor on the ground, if not, are they ‘on call’, and are their contact numbers readily available - what is the time frame for them to arrive?

· Has the closest hospital or veterinary centre been contacted to find out what facilities are available on the date/s of the event? If no hospital or veterinary centre available, what is the alternative; closest surgical referral center for horses, emergency numbers available for centre?

· If treatment is necessary for the horse or person at the scene of the accident, are there suitable screens available to shield this activity from spectators?  (Remembering multi-level arenas and stadiums.)

·Is there a large enough tarpaulin available to roll the horse on to, for pulling into the horse ambulance or to cover the horse if necessary?   Are there sufficient ropes and people allocated to move the horse if required?

• Is there a horse ambulance, eg, two horse float, with a moveable partition – is it attached to a vehicle – are the keys in the vehicle – is there an human ambulance available,  if not how long for it to reach the venue’?  If no ambulance is there a suitable mode of transport available?   Are both readily accessible to the accident area?
 
· Is there a room that the person can be moved to, for treatment or to wait for the ambulance?  Is there a stretcher?

· If the horse does not survive the accident or has to be euthanised, is there a secure area where the horse can be covered and placed, prior to being removed from the ground?

· Is there a designated pathway for the horse float/ambulance to leave the ground, i.e. getting through crowds, past stables, car park, sideshows, other fenced areas etc?

· Is there water or soil available, with hose or containers, to minimise ‘evidence’ of the accident?

·Is there provision on the entry form for details of a nominated person to be contacted in the case of an accident?

· Is there an incident/accident folder approved by the event’s insurance company available?  And a person, experienced in filling out the forms, designated for this important task?


· Have you checked with your insurance provider, that the amount of your Public Liability is sufficient to cover all the event activities?
· When an accident happens, rumors fly round like wildfire.  If the accident is serious, consider having a member of the organising committee delegated to place necessary (or update) accident information on the organisation’s Facebook  
      

HELPFUL LINKS
www.horsecouncil.org.au

www.equestrian.org.au/clubs
www.hrcav.com.au
www.pcansw.org.au
www.ponyclub.asn.au
www.qldhorsecouncil.com
gregcookhorsemanship.com
www.rwwa.com.au
www.fei.org
www.efansw.com.au

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POSITIVE TEST FOR QLD HORSE TO RABIES LIKE LYCCAVIRUS - May 2013
Biosecurity Queensland is quarantining a property on the Southern Downs after a horse tested positive to Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABLV). Chief Biosecurity officer Dr Jim Thompson said the horse was euthanased on 11 May after falling ill. “It tested negative for Hendra virus infection but further testing returned a positive result for ABLV,” he saiD. “Another horse showing similar symptoms was euthanased at the same property five days earlier. “There are 20 other horses on the property. The vet involved in both cases used PPE and took appropriate precautions.
“The site will remain under quarantine while further testing is conducted on the remaining horses. ABLV is carried by bats and flying foxes.”
Staff from the Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service Public Health Unit will visit this property to assess the situation and identify any human potentially exposed to this horse.

The public health staff will interview all people identified as having been in contact with the horse to determine whether any post-exposure treatment is required. Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young said it is important to remember that human cases of Lyssavirus are incredibly rar. “There have only been three recorded cases in Australia, all in Queensland, and sadly, all three people passed away,” Dr Young said. “All three cases were the result of direct exposure to bats with Lyssavirus. This is the first case where Australian Bat lyssavirus has been identified in a horse, although we know from overseas that horses can be infected with rabies. There is a theoretical possibility that transmission to humans could occur. “We do however have a preventative treatment that is effective in any person not displaying symptoms of the virus. “Warwick and Toowoomba Hospitals will provide a free course of this preventative treatment to anyone who public health staff determine was in close contact with this dead horse resulting in a risk of exposure to the virus. Simply patting a horse would not constitute exposure.”

People who have had a potential exposure to ABLV require an injection of rabies immunoglobulin and a series of four rabies vaccine injections. Anyone with a weakened immune system will require a further (fifth) dose of vaccine and follow up blood tests to confirm their immunity. This course of treatment is also known as post-exposure prophylaxis.

Any Darling Downs local who believes they have been in direct contact with, or in close proximity to this horse, can also contact 13 HEALTH (13 43 25 84) for advice. Staff at 13 HEALTH will help determine whether any further action, including testing or treatment, is required.
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HENDRA VIRUS: managing the risks in Western Australia- Feb 2013
By Dr Sue Skirrow, Emergency Animal Disease Preparedness manager

Download the Department of Agriculture and Food Hendra Virus PDF

What is Hendra virus?
Hendra virus is carried by flying foxes (fruit bats) in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and surrounding islands. The virus does not appear to affect flying foxes but can occasionally spread to horses. Infected horses usually die.
Forty-one Hendra virus disease cases have occurred in Australia since 1994 involving 82 horses. All have been in either Queensland or northern New South Wales. These states are investigating the reasons for the increased number of cases in 2011 and 2012.
How do horses catch Hendra virus?
It is believed that horses catch the virus by having contact with feed, water or other items contaminated by the body fluids (urine, faeces) of flying foxes. In some cases horses have transmitted the virus to other horses.
How can I reduce the risk of my horse catching Hendra virus?
If horses are kept in areas where there are flying foxes, owners/handlers can reduce the risk of the horses becoming infected by:
• removing horses from paddocks with fruiting or flowering trees or trees where flying foxes roost
• placing feed bins and water troughs under cover away from trees
• not planting trees that attract flying foxes in or near horse paddocks
• vaccination.
Vaccination
Vaccination against Hendra virus in horses is now available. If moving horses to risk areas of eastern Australia, owners should consult their veterinarian about vaccination. No vaccine is 100 per cent effective, so veterinarians and owners should still maintain good biosecurity when handling vaccinated horses.
Information about the vaccine is available at health4horses.com.au.
What is the risk of horses bringing in Hendra virus from other areas?
Wherever flying foxes and horses have contact, there is a risk that horses could develop Hendra virus. Therefore, recently arrived horses from risk areas of eastern Australia could be incubating Hendra virus.
No horses or people in Western Australia have been diagnosed with Hendra virus infection. The likelihood of Hendra virus infection occurring in WA is considered low, because of the low numbers of horses where flying foxes occur, and the relatively low concentrations of flying foxes. There needs to be close contact between flying foxes and horses for transmission of the virus.
Testing of flying foxes in northern WA has shown that some carry Hendra virus.
Horses in close contact with flying foxes have some risk of becoming infected with Hendra virus.
People in close contact with infected horses have some risk of contracting Hendra virus.

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EMERGENCY HORSE HAVEN -FORMS Oct 2012

Click to download form


The Western Australian Horse Council was developed 30 years ago, to provide a state wide voice for the horse community.  The Council can best be described as community based and is run by volunteers, who work in a number of key generic areas in the horse industry.
The Council is very committed to co-ordinating relief funds for all those in the horse community affected by natural disasters, and have been extremely active in providing support to the horse communities in Toodyay, Victoria, Carnarvon and Queensland.   In the recent bushfires around the Upper Swan, Bullsbrook and Kelmscott areas we published a data base of people offering free TEMPORARY services and support on the Council’s website www.wahorsecouncil.com.au

The Council has been offered a number of Equestrian grounds in the Metropolitan and Country areas as ‘Emergency Evacuation Centres’.  These centres would be available to the horse community requiring alternative TEMPORARY accommodation, in the event of floods, bushfires etc.   People would be responsible for providing their own equipment.
People would need to contact a designated person regarding using a centre, and also need to be aware that ‘these venues may not be available at certain times’.

The Council is asking you and your organisation to pass on this information, so that in the event of a disaster, persons are aware of how to access this assistance.

We would also encourage people to consider offering their spare yards/paddocks to people in need, so we can increase the areas covered in WA.

Apart from private property, suitable venues include equestrian centres, show grounds, racecourses, sale yards, farmland etc.
When you have lost everything, anything is acceptable.

Diane Bennit – Chair Western Australian Horse Council

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ARE YOUR HORSES BEING TERRORISED BY STABLE (Biting ) FLIES ? 5/3/12

The Stable Fly Action Group (SFAG) and the Woodridge Community Association Inc (WCA) are jointly convening a Public Meeting, to be held at the Woodridge Community Hall, cnr King Drive and Indian Ocean Drive, Woodridge, on Monday 12 March 2012 at 7.00 pm.

Poster advertising the Public Meeting is attached for downloading . (PDF)

The Minister for Agriculture & Food, Hon Terry Redman MLA, and Member for Moore, Hon Grant Woodhams, have confirmed their attendance, and other State Politicians, senior public servants, and local government representatives have been invited and are urged to attend.

The purpose of the Public Meeting is for members of the community to express their concern over the serious stable (biting) fly problem being experienced this summer in the districts of Lancelin, Guilderton, Woodridge, Gingin, Muchea and Bullsbrook, and to demand solutions to this ongoing problem, which is negatively affecting people’s livestock, pets, lifestyles and wellbeing.

SFAG and WCA strongly encourage you to attend the Public Meeting and have your say about stable (biting) fly breeding in our community, which has been continuous and unabated since 1992.

Bob Wilson
CHAIRMAN, THE STABLE FLY ACTION GROUP INC (SFAG)
Ph 9655 1055 chairman@stableflyactiongroup.org.au

If this is not possible to attend, the SFAG urges you to write letters, either handwritten or emailed, regarding the negative and animal welfare effects of stable flies on horses, to the Minister for Agriculture & Food, whose contact details are :

Hon Terry Redman MLA
Minister for Agriculture and Food
Level 11
Dumas House
2 Havelock Street
West Perth 6005

Minister.Redman@dpc.wa.gov.au

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EMERGENCY HORSE HAVENS- ONGOING LISTING UPDATED 20.2.12

With the heat hitting city and regional areas of WA this week we have already seen our first bushfires. Homes have been lost in the Margaret River area and fires are currently happening in Gosnells and Rockingham. Horse owners are offering temporary refuges for those who need to evacuate their horses from these areas.

ROWAN PRITCHARD - EAST OF MANJIMUP
I would like to list my property as being available for emergency agistment for horses ( and possibly other livestock if necessary). The property is 30 km east of Manjimpu. Contact number is 0409108277 or 0411477598

KRISTIE HOLLOWAY - TORBAY
43 Pulse Road Torbay WA 6330 Mobile: 0408 094 674

PRIME FIELD PARK - BALDIVIS
We might be a bit of a distance away but we can offer 2 paddocks and 1 stallion paddock here at Prime Field Park if someone had people to stay up here with.
W e are in Baldivis just off the Saftey Bay Road exit, on St Albans Road . Ttelephone 0406457801 mobile is glued to me 100% of the time.

MYFANWY ELLIOTT - COLLIE
The paddock is situated cnr Collie Williams Rd and Salvation Rd, 14 kms from Collie.I have only a single float but could come to help pick up horse if necessary.
My email is: myf@wn.com.au my mob: 0429016445

AREE-AYCUR FRIESIAN WARHORSES - MANJIMUP
Just to let you know that I have Stallion Quarters not being used at the moment. My Friesian Warmblood Boy is away. High electric fence away from all other boundaries ..... can house a 17 hh boy easily and I know these boys are hard to accommodate .... I also have other stables but the big boys are important. Please don't hesitate to call me if I can help 0428 465 777

Reena Harwood 73 Hind Road Manjimup .... runs directly off Graphite Road ..... Land line 9777 2242 mob 0428 465 777


WA HORSE TREKKING CLUB (WAHTC)
- BYFORD
I am able to offer a paddock for a couple of horses if needed at 161 Racy Prince Court Byford.Available are two irrigated paddocks with electric fencing, lots of trees but no stables. I will also circulate this to our members! Email: shekinah@iinet.net.au
Happy Trekking, Anna Sheehan,0412 926 932 WAHTC Secretary

SIETSKE NOBEL- BRIDGETOWN
We have safe horse paddocks available in Bridgetown for whoever needs a safe place. We can have larger number of horses down here.
Sietske NobelPhone 08 9761 9210 Mobile: 0429139655 South Western Highway,Yornup ( about 10Km south of Bridgetown)
Equi Balance For better Performance and Happier, Healthier Horses

JENNY SCAHILL - WILLIAMS
We are in Williams on Albany Hwy we have paddocks available large, small, no yards though. We are 20km north of Williams.
10983 Albany Hway. mobile 0408095325 Jenny Scahill

BEVERLEY ERRINGTON - UDUC ( HARVEY)
In light of the current bush fires in the Margaret River area, I would like you to add my details to your Emergency Assistance list.
I have limited space (only 5 acres) but have 11 electric fenced paddocks and 2 additional stables. I am located near the Harvey Golf Course at the following address: (We are located 12kms west of Harvey and about 8 kms from Myalup. 45kms North of Bunbury)
No 48 (Lot 8) Thornton Drive, UDUCHome Tel (08) 9729 3305 Work Tel (08) 9724 9503 Mobile 0409 209 043 Alt Mobile 0439 174 857

SUE JACOBSEN- Accommodation and Bowen Therapy for people and horses - GIDGEGANNUP
I have a 5 acre property in Gidgegannup with space for about 2 horses and a spare bedroom for about 2 people for emergency accommodation. Preferably not dogs though. I also do Bowen therapy for horses and people and can offer this service free of charge.

On Behalf of the Institute of Biochemic Medicine WA Branch I can offer assistance to help with minor burns, cuts scratches and trauma by using the Schuessler Tissue Salts as used by Vets in Germany. Flower Essences for trauma I can also do for free.
Sue Jacobsen Ph: 9574 6947 Mob: 0409 042 813 Clinic address: 15 Brompton Heights Gidgegannup W.A 6083
W.A State Representative for the Institute of Biochemic Medicine

CR JOHN ALLERT - BODDINGTON
I have 40 acres and a block of three stables. My property is at 127 Twin Bridges Place, Crossman (10km from Boddington) I am also a member fo the Crossman Bush Fire Brigade so have some training in this area. I'd be only to happy to help any horse owners should the need arise. Mob. 0427 103 478
Cr John Allert President Shire of Boddington

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HORSES AND BUSHFIRES

Download the PDF brochure prepared by the WA Horse council on being prepared for bushfires

HORSES AND BUSHFIRES.pdf (164 kb)

Further Sources of Information on Fire Preparedness
www.fesa.wa.gov.au
www.dpi.vic.gov.au

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EMERGENCY HORSE HAVENS- fires February2011

BUSHFIRE ASSISTANCE UPDATE (WAHC)- Final notification- 8th February 2011  
THE COUNCIL FEELS THAT THERE HAVE BEEN SUFFICIENT OFFERS OF HELP IN THESE UPDATES AND WE WOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS OUR GRATITUDE TO EVERYBODY WHO HAS OFFERED ASSISTANCE TO THOSE PEOPLE AND HORSES WHO SUFFERED IN THE BUSHFIRES – THIS WILL BE THE FINAL UPDATE – HOWEVER, ANY  FURTHER OFFERS OF ASSISTANCE - WILL BE KEPT  IN CASE IT BECOMES NECESSARY TO PASS THEM ON  -  IF ANYONE REQUIRES HELP AT A LATER DATE – PLEASE CONTACT DIANE BENNIT, CHAIR WAHC 92910202  0409083617
FINAL   UPDATE
Midnight Tuesday 8th February
Dolly van Zaane,  Chittering -  can take up to 12 horses  and has accommodation for several people  95714525  
Brigit Bachs,  Darling Downs – one small paddock for 2 horses and can feed hay for the short term –also has a double horse float and can pick up if required. 0407154739
Tony Sprlyan,  Mariginup -  paddock, round yard for 2 horses, has a float – they are happy to take dogs   0408937054
Alison Hume,  Wanneroo  -  2 large grassed paddocks, would suit up to 15 horses that could be kept together – 2 stables, 1 yard 0410545104   -  Janelle 0411755201
Greg Johnson,  West Swan  -  can take up to 10 horses and float up to 12 whenever required   0418948855
Wendy Reid,  Mandurah – can take 2 horses  95821100
REGISTER ON THE WAHC FREE  EMERGENCY DATA BASE –  THERE ARE REGULAR UPDATES ON ALL WA EMERGENCY OR BIO SECURITY SITUATIONS -  LOG ON TO    WWW.WAHORSEEMERGENCY.COM.AU
PREVIOUS   UPDATE
9.30am. Tuesday 8th February
James Berry  West Swan   - up to 6 horses, accommodation and a 3 horse float, can pick up  0409298092
Louise Atkinson  Bullsbrook – 2 paddocks, yards, short term   self  contained  accommodation – one room, 3 beds, kitchen bathroom  95712575
The offer of a house, yards and stables is available – situated 30 minutes north east of Midland – ring the WAHC  92910202  for details.
PREVIOUS   UPDATE
4.30pm  Monday 7th February 2011
The WAHC has been requested by the Dept of Emergency Management to provide the WAHC contact details to the Dept of Environment and Conservation – who will pass the information on to the FESA Bushfire Communications Centre to give out to people who need assistance.
Toni Leahy-Fripp Kenwick – paddock space for 3 to 4 horses 0435690303
Claire,   Santora Arabians  5 minutes from Armadale, on Southwest Highway  – large paddock, all new fencing 0419545476
Sandra Button,  Mundaring – up to 3 horses and a spare double room    95722367     0419947870
Robyn Cottman  Henley Brook – can accommodate 4 horses has a double horse float and is prepared to transport horses if required  0422808776
Pineview Stables,  Wanneroo -  can take up to 10 horses and have 2 double horses floats  0408005378
Carol,  Mundaring – 2 secure bare paddocks available, can provide hay short term  92953889
Nic Easton,  Goosebery Hill – double horse float available Wk 94545479   0415183544
PREVIOUS  UPDATE
9.30pm Sunday 6th February 6, 2011
Janice Keelan at Cardup – has accommodation for two people and one horse 95254277
Sharon Joyce in West Swan – has yards available 0417964689
Suzi Dickson – has a large aviary available for birds and accommodation for pets  0457088980
Kelly Webb,   Henley Brook – up to 10 horses, 2 and 3 horse float can pick up if required  0414508420
Cherilyn Wright,   Bullsbrook – 0437679206
PREVIOUS UPDATE
SUNDAY 6TH FEBRUARY
Alison Logan – Academy Equestrian  Wanneroo has  stables and yards available 0418681529
Tim and Debbie Wright –Bullsbrook  have already rescued 4 horses – they have two floats and are ready to assist in more rescues – they also have yards and paddocks available  0418880331
Nikki Brooks – Brookleigh Equestrian Estate, Brigadoon – yards and bunkhouse accommodation available   0412777377

 

EMERGENCY EQUINE HAVENS - Response from Councils as at September 09
Letters relating to the Western Australian Horse Council developing a statewide emergency register for people willing to assist owners, either with the evacuation of horses or by providing agistment, paddocks or stables for various categories of horses, in the event of an emergency evacuation, were forwarded to 140 Local Government Shires across Western Australia.

The Council was seeking information from Local Government Shires on the current revision of their Emergency Management Plan, to cover this type of crisis and identifying a safe haven or havens, for those horse owners within their Shires Suitable emergency evacuation venues could be sale yards, football or show grounds etc.

As more information becomes available the WAHC will formulate a register.

The following shires have responded:

Shire Of Beverley - identified one venue;
Shire of Boyup Brook - three locations identified as emergency evacuation points and a fouth with limited facilities;
Shire Of Brookton - matter to go to next Local Emergency Management Committee meeting in September;
Shire Of Capel - well positioned to look after animals in an emergency;
Shire Of Donnybrook - request ed copy of Emergency register on completeion by the WAHC;
Shire Of Goomalling - revising EMP to include horses. One safe haven nominated;
Shire Of Katanning - reviewing its Emergency Management Plan (EMP) and will take horses into consideration;
Shire Of Lake Grace - revising EMP to include horses;
Mayanup Progress Association - nominated one venue;
Shire Of Menzies - nominated venue for horse evacuation;
Shire Of Murray - Emergency Risk Management Plans being developed and safe havens and evacuation points will be
considered during review;
Shire Of Northam - 5 venues identified ;
Shire Of Northampton - identified options for potential venues but would determine what is best at time of emergency;
Shire Of Perenjorie - revising EMP to include horses. Two safe havens nominated.
Shire OF Rockingham - will put request in their newsletter;
Shire Of Wandering - a joint initiative with Pingelly who will be administering the EM Plan;
Shire Of Waroona - forwarded their Emergency Animal Welfare Plan and nominated one venue with options for moving
animals to another venue outside the shire if deemed necessary.

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Bushfire Preparedness for Horses - April 2009
As current information available on Bush Fire Preparedness was not specific to horse owners, relating more to the property rather than the horses, committee member Tracy Talbot coordinated the production of a pamphlet on minimising the fire risk for horse owners and developing a Bushfire Action Plan.

The pamphlets draft format has been presented to Fire and Emergency Services Authority (FESA) and once completed will be uploaded to the web along with an Action Plan Checklist that can be downloaded. The aim is to have this pamphlet circulated to an many horse owners as possible in high risk areas by working with the Fire and Emergency Services Authority (FESA), State Emergency services (SES) and local shires.

Texan Tips to Protect Horses from Wildfire - August 21 2009
by: Texas AgriLife Extension Service
Article # 14762

Horse owners and ranchers can take precautions to reduce the risk and spread of wildfire and protect their animals from injury or death by fire, said Texas AgriLife agents.

"The most important thing to remember is to have a fire plan in place," said Rick Machen, Texas AgriLife Extension Service livestock specialist in Uvalde. "You'll have a limited time to react when a wildfire hits, so you'll need to be prepared and practiced for it."

The plan should include how to access and transport livestock that might be in danger, he said.

"Make sure you have keys to padlocks and can get easy access to every gate on the perimeter fence," Machen said.

If there's a wildfire, farmers and horse owners need to know in advance what their priorities are, he noted.

"Sometimes firefighters will ask which they should save first--a structure, livestock, machinery or feed," he said.

If you have time to evacuate livestock, proceed with caution, he said, as some animals might refuse to leave and others might run back into a burning barn or building.

"Close gates that give livestock access to dangerous or soon-to-be dangerous areas," Machen said. "When evacuating the animals, be sure to keep them from going into areas where they might become trapped or have a limited chance of escape."

Livestock are frequently injured or killed by running into fences, barriers, and other obstructions while trying to flee, he added. Having the right equipment and experienced handlers to move livestock is important, but if time is of the essence it might be necessary to release the animals and recapture them later.

All farm and ranch family members and workers should be on the lookout for potential fire hazards and know how to respond in case of a fire, added Bruce Lesikar, AgriLife Extension agricultural engineer.

Lesikar said some basic safety precautions should include installing and maintaining smoke detectors in barns and buildings, placing fire extinguishers in barns, vehicles, and tractors, and posting emergency numbers in a central location near a telephone.

"To help prevent or feed a fire, store fuels, pesticides, and other chemicals away from heat sources and combustible materials," he said. "If there's a wildfire, these should be removed from the premises."

He added that trash, hay, lumber, empty feed sacks, and other flammable materials should be kept away from barns and buildings.

Firebreaks or fireguards are another useful tool in helping prevent the spread of wildfire, noted Wayne Hanselka, an AgriLife Extension program leader for rangeland ecology management based in Corpus Christi.

"As their names indicate, these are designed to keep fire in or out of a pasture," Hanselka said. "Cleared firebreaks must extend to bare ground or mineral soil with no line of continuous dead fuel that allows the fire to creep across the fire line."

He added there are a variety of firebreaks and method for creating them, and they "should be constructed to meet the needs of the individual landowner while offering protection to rangelands and pastures."

Wildfires travel quickly, especially when there's a high wind, so being proactive rather than reactive is the best approach, added Charles "Butch" Taylor, a Texas AgriLife Research expert in grazing management and fire ecology based in Sonora.

Taylor said another preparatory method for wildfire control is green-stripping.

"Green-stripping is a technique that can be used on rangeland and improved pasture and involves burning a strip around the perimeter of a pasture under safe, prescribed conditions, including high relative humidity and low wind speed," he said.

Taylor said the strip or firebreak is typically from 100 feet to 1000 feet wide and needs to be burned down prior to the major wildfire season.

"Most wildfires in Texas occur from February through March and usually come with high winds," he said. "If you live in an area characterized by high winds during this period, you may need a wider fire-guard."

Taylor said the term green-stripping comes from the response of the vegetation after a prescribed burn.

"Once the grass starts to green up, livestock will be attracted to the restored area," he said. "Research has shown that for up to two years livestock will spend most of their grazing time in these areas."

He added that since the potential wildfire "fuel loads" will be lower in these areas, two purposes are served--a wildfire might be prevented from crossing the green area, and, if one does, there's a high probability livestock will be on these strips and better protected from the fire.

More information on wildfire and protecting livestock from it can be found at the Texas Extension Disaster Education Network Web site <http://texashelp.tamu.edu/004-natural/fires.php>


EMERGENCY EQUINE HAVENS - March 2009
Committee member Robert Hawes was able to ascertain that the Fire and Emergency Services Authority (FESA), RSPCA and the WA Rangers Association are in the process of reviewing a memorandum of understanding for 'Authorising the Use of the Animal Emergency Group'. The objectives of the MOU include :- provide the basis for the provision and coordination of animal welfare resources during emergencies and at the time of minor incidences not declared emergencies. The MOU is understood to have arisen from the Emergency Management Act 2005 and all local governments have been invited to review their arrangements under the Act.

The Horse Council has discovered that provision for horses in the Act needs to be enlarged and, recognising the validity of the original enquiry, has taken the initiative to offer our help in rectifying this matter. We have been invited to send a representative to the next meeting where we will be making a submission to include larger animals than are normally dealt with by the RSPCA, and to widen the range of venues where horses could safely be held for the duration of the emergency.
Information will be uploaded as and when any progress has been made.

March 2009
Letter from Jill Davies - Busselton WA

Bush Fire Horse Register for WA
Since I moved down to Boyup Brook in the spring of 2007, one thing concerned me, what would happen to my horses if there was a bush fire? Where could we go?

I only arrived to Australia in 2004 and do not know many people in my area who also have horses that could help me. After the bush fires in Bridgetown and Victoria I began to ask questions to find out if the EFA WA or the RSPA or Horse Council or the FESA had any plan in place for evacuating horses.

After doing my research it became apparent there is nothing to help horse owners in a time of crisis. The last thing you would be wanting to do in an emergency would be to either try and get a phone signal (very poor in the best of times) or to try and find this info on the web!! This problem could be easily solved if there was a plan already in place for horse owners.

I have been on Stockyard and seen that some other horse owners are willing to offer paddocks and stables, but there was nothing concrete and the last thing when a bush fire is coming is wondering, where can I take my horses?

The Plan:
To organize for WA a bush fire register of people willing to assist horse owners either with the evacuation of horses or with adjustment/paddocks/stables for various categories of horses. E.g. not every one would have the fencing or would want to have a stallion on their property if the only horse facilities they had were for mares and foals.

I fully appreciate that Perth has the State Equestrian Centre as an evacuation centre but I am sure that I am not the only other horse owner in rural WA and we would not have that luxury.

My suggestion is that people could register either on line or via telephone or by mail to state where they lived and in what capacity they could assist other horse owners. The WA Horse Council already has in place the Emergency web site, this could be used for the Bush Fire Register where horse owners could log on well before an emergency occurred to find out where they could go and know the location and have it a print out readily available with the address details.

The register could also be used by the local fire authorities if they have to evacuate horses when the owners where not on the property. The fire authorities would have a place to take the horses to and the owners would know where their horses went to as well.

To start off with, the bush fire register could be publicised by the horse magazine Hoofbeats and also via the web sites such as WA Horse Council, the EFA WA branch, Stockyard and Cavalletti web sites.

Memos could go out to all Pony and Riding Clubs, the WA Ag Department regional offices, Murdoch and Curtin (Muresk) Universities. Farriers‚ horse dentists etc. could all be contacted to let their clients know of the register. If it was possible, adverts could also go up in Horseland, Europa and Saddleworld and all other Stock feeders in regional WA.

The horse owners would be able to access the information for their area and have a Horse preparation plan in place as well as their own bush fire evacuation plan.

Many thanks for putting this to the committee, I look forward to hearing from you in due course.

Kind Regards
Jill Davies, Boyup Brook

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The WA HORSE EMERGENCY DATABASE
The WA Horse Emergency website http://www.wahorseemergency.com.au/ has been developed by the WA Horse Council following the 2007 Equine Influenza outbreak which highlighted the difficulties the equine industry had in communicating information in the case of an emergency in the horse industry.

The website has been developed by the WA Horse Council with funding coming from the State Governments response to Equine Influenza and the clear need for the Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) to be able to communicate with the equestrian sector of the horse industry in a manner similar to the capability that Racing and Wagering WA can communicate with the Thoroughbred and harness racing sectors.

The website allows for clubs and associations, horse owners, horse related businesses and other people involved in providing services to the horse industry to register their contact details on-line to ensure that in the event of an emergency they receive up-to-date information on the situation. All those registered will be asked to pass the information on to their members, friends, clients or associates.

The information is confidential and will only be used in the event of a genuine emergency. The Council will not allow the information to be used for marketing purposes. The website will be activated by the administrator as necessary throught the year to ensure that the website data is accurate and current.

As at June 2009 there are over10,000 Western Australians registered either as individuals or under the umberella of their club or association however, this is only a percentage of the horse community so the data base is continually growing as more people involved with horses register so it is an ongoing project.

If you haven’t already done so go to our Horse Emergency information webpage and register NOW for this free service.

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BIO-SECURITY CONTINGENCY PLAN. Procedures for horse events
Started Sept 2007 - completed Nov 2007 For details, download the PDF here.

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AWARENESS PROGRAM
The August 2007 outbreak of Equine Influenza in Australia identified a requirement for the provision of information and training in managing a horse disease emergency.

In an emergency, speedy action will be needed to stop the movement of horses, people and vehicles, and initiate disease control procedures.

At the request of the WA Equine Industry Consultative Group, the WA Horse Council co–ordinated an Awareness Program working party, which included representation from Equestrian Western Australia and Racing and Wagering Western Australia.

Six Awareness workshops were held throughout the state and were attended by representatives from all the major key equestrian communicators. Each attendee received practical tools to assist them through the planning and training process, in developing specific plans on how to prepare for a suspect disease case at an event, and what to do in the event of a state equine standstill.

A folder or DVD containing the information covered at the workshops is available FREE and is an essential requirement for all Event Organisers. Contact Diane Bennit 9291 0202 or email bennit@optusnet.com.au

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AERIAL CULLING
The Western Australian Horse Council (WAHC) is asking for your organisation to support us in our protest regarding the aerial culling of horses in WA. The recent cull took place on Fraser Downs Station, south of Broome. It has been reported that photos of the slaughter are devastating, with very obvious shoulder and back shots and neck shots in foals. WAHC Committee person veterinarian Dr Kathy Klein sayes “its hard enough to effectively put down a horse with one shot at point blank range, let alone at 60 kms per hour from a moving helicopter”

One survivor was a young colt foal who wandered into the station community and first alerted people to what had occurred. Unfortunately “Jimminy” who was being hand reared, contracted a sudden and serious infection, probably due to a lowered immune system after everything he had been through. After losing the use of his back legs, he was euthanased by the local veterinarian.

Aerial culling is banned in New South Wales and South Australia, and the WAHC with the support of the Horse Industry hopes to establish a state-wide ban on aerial culling of all equines (including donkeys).

We are asking your organisation to write a letter protesting this type of culling to the RSPCA and any other outlets you feel relevant. See attached copy of WAHC letter which has been sent to the RSPCA, DAFF, newspapers, media and radio outlets, politicians, clubs, breeds, organisations etc.

The only way that a state-wide ban will be introduced, is if enough people and organisations
make themselves heard.

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MYSTERY VIRUS IN WA - 9th Aug 2013
Updated horse health information- Department of Agriculture and Food
The Department of Agriculture and Food has completed testing of samples to identify the cause of small mouth bumps (papules) reported in horses on three properties in the South-West in June.

No evidence of viral or other infectious disease was found by extensive testing.

The affected horses had small papules in the mouth and on the side of the tongue and showed mild ill-health signs. Samples from the affected horses were originally tested in June by the Australian Animal Health Laboratories (AAHL) to rule out the exotic disease vesicular stomatitis.Following ruling out of this exotic disease, DAFWA's Animal Health Laboratories carried out comprehensive tests on the samples submitted to assist the private veterinarians managing the casesto determine the cause of the papule-like lesions. All affected horses have since recovered.
People examining healthy horses' mouths may sometimes see small lumps and mechanical damagefrom hay and grass seeds that are not necessarily of concern. There are also structures found in horses' mouths that may appear like papules but are entirely normal. However, horse owners who are concerned about the health of their horses should contact their veterinarian.

There have been reports that some humans who have had contact with affected horses have developed similar lesions. It is not clear if there is a relationship between the lesions reported in horses and people, and Department of Health testing has not revealed a cause for the lesions in people. The Department of Health advises that people handling affected horses should take general precautions, such as wearing disposable gloves and a face mask, and washing their hands well after contact with affected horses.

People concerned about their health should consult a general practitioner.
DAFWA reminds horse owners to follow standard horse biosecurity recommendations including only
taking healthy horses to events and not allowing their horses to share feed, water, or tack and equipment with other horses.
For more information about horse biosecurity, visit agric.wa.gov.au and search 'horse alert'.

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